Resources

Annals of Library Information Studies, one of India ‘s oldest peer reviewed LIS research journal published by CSIR-NISCAIR has launched its open access archive 

(http://nopr.niscair.res.in/ handle/123456789/66 ) since its inception (i.e, Vol.1 , No.-1, 1954). One can find around 54 articles contributed by Dr. S. R. Ranganathan .

04 May 2014

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[IFLA-L] Free download of the book “Library Architecture: Recommendations for a comprehensive research project” by Santi Romero

Dear Colleagues
 
The IFLA Library Buildings and Equipment Section would like to inform you about the
Free Download of the Library Planning Book
Library Architecture: Recommendations for a comprehensive research project
By Santi Romero
Thanks to the agreement reached between the editor (COAC – Col·legi d’Arquitectes de Catalunya), the Gerència de Serveis de Biblioteques of the Diputació de Barcelona and the author himself, it is possible to download as a pdf file free of charge the book “Library Architecture: Recommendations for a comprehensive research projectby Santi Romero.It is a book specialized in library buildings that want to be an instrument to plan and design a library in a comprehensive way, thanks to the joint work of architects, librarians and users.This book, targeted to these professionals, can also be of great help to the public or private developers for planning library services and for planning and building the library.

It is a monograph based on the library reality of our country, and it fills the void that existed regarding publications specialized in this matter.

The book is available on the Diputació de Barcelona webpage in three languages:

Catalan: L’Arquitectura de la Biblioteca: Recomanacions per a un projecte integral – 2nd edition (July 2004)

http://www.diba.cat/biblioteques/documentspdf/arquitectura_biblioteca2.pdf

Spanish: La Arquitectura de la Biblioteca: Recomendaciones para un proyecto integral – 2nd edition (December 2003)
 
 
English: Library Architecture: Recommendations for a comprehensive research project – (December 2008)
 
 
 
If you would like to print the information, it is advisable to download the whole book first. Not all browsers allow printing it directly from the webpage.
 

Santi Romero architect
Head of Library Architecture Unit
Library Services Management Unit
Presidency Service
Diputació de Barcelona

Comte d’Urgell, 187 (08036 Barcelona – SPAIN)
Tel +34 934 022 016 · +34 676 930 408
romerogs@diba.cat · http://diba.cat/biblioteques

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Information on the LIS Trends Blog (Highlights from June to September 2013)

The LIS Trends blog  http://listrends.blogspot.com/
          
CONTENTS:
Academic libraries / Information Science / Library Associations & Unions / Library of Congress / LIS Education / National libraries / State Libraries / Research libraries
·         VIDEO (3:25) Digitization of the Czech National Library
·         VIDEO (1:20:39) The loss and rebirth of the Library of Alexandria (by Ismail Serageldin)
Archives / Art Galleries /  Cultural Heritage / Monuments / Museums / Presidential libraries / Private libraries / Special Collections / Special libraries 
·         The beginning of time? World’s oldest ‘calendar’ discovered (Mesolithic monument, Scotland)
·         VIDEO (8:10) Saki Mafundikwa: Ingenuity and elegance in ancient African alphabets (TED 2013 video)
 
 
Audiobooks
 
 
Career management / Job hunting / Job market /  Job losses / Work place / Unemployment
 
Citation analysis / Collection development / Document delivery / Interlibrary loans / Library use / Library users / Use studies
 
 
Conferences and other events / Papers & Presentations / Proceedings
·         ACRL 2013 Proceedings
·         African Library Summit 2013 (2 – 5 July 2013)
Ø  Don’t leave me behind! It’s my first time in South Africa – delegates on their way to the workshops
Data curation / Data management
 
Digital librarianship / Digital libraries / Databases / Digitisation / Preservation / Ebooks / E-readers / Gateways / Interactive charts and maps / Platforms / Portals / OCLC/ OERs / Open Access / Virtual LIS / Web 1.0, 2.0 & 3.0 / Information Age / WorldCat
·         Open Data Policy Guidelines
 
 
Earth / Space / Weather
Ethics / Information ethics / Research
 
Forecasts / Predictions / The future / Special reports / Trends
·         20 Forecasts for 2013 – 2025 (Special Report of The World Future Society)
·         IFLA Trend Report
 
 
General
Health/ Medicine
·         BOOK (2013) Happy-People-Pills for all
 
 
Higher education / Primary & Secondary Education / Adolescents / Children / Educators / MOOCs / Learning / Online learning
·         UK BIS Research Paper #130: The maturing of the MOOC
 
Information literacy / Digital literacy / Discovery tools / Google / LibGuides / Library instruction / Search engines / Tutorials / Wikipedia
·         BOOK (2013) Developing digital literacies: a framework for professional learning (Focus on teachers and students)
 
Internet / Computers / Broadband / Augmented reality / Artificial intelligence / Cyber attacks / Cyberbullying / Cybercrime / Gaming / Robotics / TV / Wi-Fi / Wikileaks
 
 
Institutional Repositories
 
 
Leadership / Library management
 
 
Libraries in general, Librarians / Librarianship / Library quality / Library systems  
·         BOOK (2013) Handbook of academic writing for librarians
·         VIDEO (3:01) Book Domino Chain World Record
 
 
New technology / Innovation / Discovery /Mobile technology / Networking / Social Technology / Social Media / iPad / apps / Skype
·         ARTICLE (2013) Librarians’ attitudes towards mobile services
·         VIDEO (55:18) Erik Hersman: Innovating Africa
·         VIDEO (16:35) The end of humanity: Nick Bostrom at TEDxOxford
·         What is Flipboard? (2 videos)
 
 
New and/or interesting information resources / Books / Cartoonists / Writers / Poets
·         BOOK (2013) Bringing the Arts into the Library
·         BOOK (2013) Bundu Food for the African Bush (also available in Afrikaans: Boendoe-kos vir die Afrika-bos)
·         BOOK (2013) How to teach your children Shakespear
·         BOOK (2013) My brief history (by Stephen Hawking)
·         BOOK (2013) The immortal life of Henrietta Lacks – thought-provoking book!
·         Canadian Journal of Information and Library Science (vol 37, no 2, June 2013)
·         VIDEO (3:21) Sad Cat Diary
 
 
Public libraries / Public information institutions / School libraries
·         BOOK (2013) Adult programs in the library, 2nd edition
·         BOOK (2013) Enhancing teaching and learning, 3rd edition: a leadership guide for school librarians (includes a new chapter on “the virtual school library”)
·         BOOK (2013) School librarian’s career planner
·         IMLS Research Paper #5: The state of small and rural libraries in the United States
·         More little free libraries
Publishers / Publications / Copyright issues / Amazon / Kindle

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Library Connect Monthly – Library Evolution, Open Access, Researchers’ Reputations

 

view this email in a browser

Library Connectleafs


LIBRARY CONNECT MONTHLY — October 2013


Sherri MichaelsWelcome to the October edition of Library Connect Monthly . Congratulations to Sherri Michaels, Head of Collection Management at Indiana University Bloomington, on winning the Elsevier Library Connect Charleston Conference Award . Charleston Conference attendees are invited to visit with Elsevier at Table 73, at the Elsevier-sponsored refreshment break, or at several sessions where we will have experts speaking. >> View full schedule

IN THIS ISSUE:

  • Library evolution
  • Open access content and webinar
  • Librarians raising researchers’ reputations

http://mail.elsevier-alerts.com/AEM/Clients/ECU001/2011lcn/Wayne_Sime.jpg

Embracing the digital library
By Wayne Sime, Director of Library Services, Royal Society of Medicine

With the effective implementation and use of digital resources, medical librarians have the opportunity to become part of the frontline, which can be incredibly rewarding in seeing how patient care has been improved as a result of their role.


Aliya Sarsembinova

Three academic years: Stages of library development
By Aliya Sarsembinova, Director, Nazarbayev University Scientific Library

How Kazakhstan’s Nazarbayev University Scientific Library created a Western-style university library by writing a concept for the library’s development and an implementation plan, including actions, timelines, and expected outcomes.


Rachel Martin

6 ways to find Elsevier’s open access content
By Rachel Martin, Universal Access Communications Manager, Elsevier

A series of tips on finding open access articles and journals within ScienceDirect. Elsevier now publishes 56 open-access journals, hosts a further 91 on behalf of our society and publishing partners, and more than 1,600 of our subscription journals support open access publishing.

UPCOMING WEBINAR

WEBINAR NOW AVAILABLE ONLINE

http://mail.elsevier-alerts.com/AEM/Clients/ECU001/2011lcn/Open-Access-Logo-100.gif

How librarians can help researchers navigate open access choices

Thursday, Oct. 17
11:00-11:50 a.m. EST (16:00-16:50 BST / 17:00-17:50 CEST)

REGISTER

Attendance is free; however, preregistration is required. Cannot attend on Oct. 17? Register to receive notification when the recorded webcast is available online.

Library Connect Webinar

Join more than 1,000 librarians who viewed September’s Library Connect webinar:

How librarians are raising researchers’ reputations: An exploration of academic networks, profiles and analysis

Access the webinar resources:

 Webinar replay

 Slides

 Q&A

————————————-
[IFLA-L] “Library and information professionals improving the lives of women in Asia Oceania” on 21 August – Invitation

Dear IFLA colleagues
The Women, Information and Libraries Special Interest Group cordially invites WLIC delegates to Conference Session 189 Library and information professionals improving the lives of women in Asia Oceania” on 21 August  2013 13:45 – 15:45 in Room Summit 2. The session programme includes:
·         Library strategies for literacy improvement of women in the Asia Oceania Region
MOHAMMAD MAHDI JAHANI YEKTA (Iranian Research Institute for Information Science and Technology – Iran Doc, Tehran, Iran)
·         Information requirements of women entrepreneurs in Pune City
DURGA MURARI and SHUBHADA NAGARKAR (SNDT Women’s University Library, Pune, India)
·         Serving women in China: practice and projects in a public library
YANG RONG (Nanshan Library of Shenzhen City, Shenzhen, Guangdong Province, China)
·         Beyond borders: the influence of librarians, libraries and access to information for Papua New Guinean women participating in Australian university education
SUZANNE LIPU (School of Information Studies, Charles Sturt University, Wagga Wagga, NSW, Australia)
Followed by a panel discussion.
Please also note that the Women, Information and Libraries Special Interest Group Open Business Meeting takes place on Thursday 22nd at 13:15 – 14:45 in Room 311. As this year we see the changing of conveners for the Group, please join us to warmy welcome Beba Stankovic as the new Women, Information and Libraries Special Interest Group 2014-16.
We also would like to draw your attention to an interesting paper to be presented on Sunday 18 August 2013 13:45 – 15:45 at Room: Summit 2 as part of the Social Sciences Section Session, Libraries and social movements: a force for change. The paper is titled “Academic libraries advancing transnational feminism” and will be presented by KAYO DENDA and LUCY VIDAL (Rutgers University, New Jersey, USA).

 
Kind regards,
Maria

Maria Cotera
Convener,
Women, Information & Libraries Special Interest Group
——————————
NEW LIBRARY REPORT INTO THE PERCEIVED VALUE OF ACADEMIC LIBRARIES IN DEVELOPING WORLD COUNTRIES has just been released.

 
The full report can be accessed from:http://www.sagepublications.com/libraries/dw . Follow the conversations on twitter at #libvalue
 

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[IFLA-L] Library Buildings and Equipment Section’s Newsletter no. 2 2013

 

Dear colleagues,

 Please find our Newsletter, 2013, no 2, from Library Buildings and Equipment Section online on the Section’s website.

 In this issue we have:

BIG BOX LIBRARY: The McAllen (Texas) Main Library    By Jack Poling, AIA LEED AP, with Jeffrey Scherer, FAIA

 LBES’s Midyear Meeting in Stockholm and Umeå, Sweden

You will also find the Program  for our Satellite Meeting with the theme:

 Making Ends Meet: High Quality Design on a Low Budget

 

And our open session in Singapore with the theme:

The library and the city

 

Best regards,

Ingvild Monsen
Editor of the Newsletter

 ********************

[IFLA-L] *Guidelines for Digital Newspaper Preservation Readiness – Now Available for Public Review/Comment

*Guidelines for Digital Newspaper Preservation Readiness – Now Available for Public Review/Comment**********************
The Chronicles in Preservation project (http://metaarchive.org/neh) is
proud to announce the release of the online review edition of the *Guidelines for Digital Newspaper Preservation Readiness*. This is the first majordeliverable from this three-year project (2011-2014) funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) to research and document a series of preservation readiness steps for digital newspaper curators.

http://publishing.educopia.org/chronicles/*About the Guidelines*
The *Guidelines for Digital Newspaper Preservation Readiness* seek to address digital preservation standards and digital newspaper technical guidelines/practices across a spectrum of readiness options. The *Guidelines* are geared toward improving preservation readiness for both digitized and born-digital newspaper content. We hope they will be helpful for a wide range of stakeholder institutions (including commercial news publishers), particularly traditional memory stewards such as libraries, archives, and historical societies.*How to Review*
Interested digital preservation practitioners and experts/curators working in the area of managing and preserving digital news and newspapers are encouraged to review and supply online comments at their leisure between July 22-September 20, 2013. Review comments can be provided via the CommentPress form in the right sidebar (name and email address are required). Each page can be individually printed or saved as a PDF for offline reading (ctrl+ or cmd+ P, Save as PDF).As the Introduction to the *Guidelines* states:  We need content curators to help us understand what we’ve missed (we knowthere are gaps!) and what we’ve nailed. We want to know where you need more guidance and where you need less description. We want you to point us towards other resources in the field we may have missed, and above all, we want you to engage with us and with each other to make the final *Guidelines* as useful as they can possibly be.
*Chronicles in Preservation Partners*
The Chronicles in Preservation project is being led by the Educopia
Institute (host for the MetaArchive Cooperative), along with the San Diego Supercomputer Center and the libraries of University of North Texas, Penn State, Virginia Tech, University of Utah, Georgia Tech, Boston College, and Clemson University.Thank you,

Katherine Skinner, PhD
Executive Director, Educopia Institute
katherine.skinner@metaarchive.org
+1 404 783 2534

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[EIFL-all] EIFL Newsletter No. 64 – July – August 2013

Having problems reading this email? Please click here to view online version

EIFL letterhead image

No. 64 – July – August 2013

 

EIFL-Licensing Update

EIFL has signed a renewal agreement with Oxford University Press for Oxford Handbooks Online. The agreement runs to 31 December 2015.
EIFL has signed a renewal agreement with Oxford University Press for Oxford Scholarship Online. The agreement runs to 31 December 2015.
EIFL has signed a renewal agreement with Nature Publishing Group for Nature Publishing Group Journals. The agreement runs to 31 December 2016.
 

EIFL-OA Update

EIFL and CHAIN-REDS signed a Memorandum of Understanding to promote the adoption of consolidated standards in the e-Infrastructures for Research and Education, with the ultimate aim of widening the opportunities of data sharing across different e-Infrastructures and continents (Asia, Africa, Europe and Latin America ).
Iryna Kuchma, EIFL Open Access Programme Manager was presented with the 2012 Open Access Award during a conference in Uganda . This is Electronic Publishing Trust for Development (EPT)’s 2nd Annual Award, in ‘recognition of the effort made by individuals working in the developing and emerging countries in the furtherance of open access to scholarly publications’.
The Consortium of Uganda University Libraries (CUUL) in partnership with EIFL and the Regional Universities Forum for Capacity Building in Agriculture (RUFORUM) organised the first national conference on “Open access (OA), knowledge sharing and sustainable scholarly communication in Uganda ” in Kampala .
Mykolas Romeris University , Lithuania , has been actively involved in the open access movement. In June 2013 it adopted an open access policy and launched its open access institutional repository to ensure open access to the scientific production of the University.
Funding has been granted to 10 projects in Africa, Asia, and Europe: three projects in Africa (in Ethiopia , Lesotho and Senegal ), a project in Asia (in China ) and six projects in Europe ( Armenia , Belarus , Estonia , Moldova , Poland and Serbia ).
 

EIFL-IP Update

“This is not the end of a process, but the start of an era – an era of hope that the blight of the book famine may finally be coming to an end”. EIFL closing statement delivered in Marrakesh on 27 June 2013 on the new WIPO Treaty for print disabled people.
In June 2013 after an intense negotiation, Least Developed Countries (LDCs) were granted an extension of the transition period for implementation of the WTO Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS). EIFL and other NGOs were however dismayed at the EU press release that followed.
Read the impressive achievements of eight EIFL-IP projects in Africa, Asia and Europe . Check how the strategies and tactics can be applied in any country.
 

EIFL-PLIP Update

Farmers in Uganda are consulting plant doctors about plant pests and diseases; learning about new farming methods in local languages and using information and communication technology to share knowledge. Read the results of three public library agricultural services supported by EIFL-PLIP.
With EIFL-PLIP support, two libraries in Kenya and Ghana are using computers and the internet to help struggling schoolchildren improve their school results and pass exams.
Public Library Radislav Nikčević in Jagodina , Serbia , has won a prestigious ERSTE Foundation Award for Social Integration 2013, for its AgroLib-Ja service which improves farmers’ lives. The service was launched in 2010 with support from EIFL-PLIP.
Congratulations to the two libraries that won the EIFL-PLIP Innovation Award – for library services that use information and communication technology (ICT) to empower women and girls.
We take pleasure in sharing the results of two library health services funded by EIFL-PLIP in Africa . The services, in Ghana and Uganda , use information and communication technology (ICT) – including mobile phone text messaging (SMS), the internet and radio – to help build healthy communities.
 

Events

 
3 Jul 2013
Africa Library Summit 2013. Location: Pretoria – South Africa
8 Jul 2013
DSpace installation programme in Kenya. Location: Various – Kenya
19 Jul 2013
26 Jul 2013
Open access policies in Moldova kick-off meeting. Location: Chisinau – MoldovaMoldova State University Library
29 Jul 2013
WIPO copyright committee (26th session). Location: Geneva – Switzerland
17 Aug 2013
EIFL-PLIP at IFLA 2013. Location: Suntec Singapore International Convention & Exhibition Centre – Singapore
29 Aug 2013
Seminar on OA policy development in Moldova. Location: Chisinau – MoldovaAcademy of Economic Studies Library
 

Keep in touch | About EIFL

 
 RSS
EIFL is an international not-for-profit organisation based in Europe with a global network of partners. Working in collaboration with libraries in more than 60 developing and transition countries in Africa, Asia, Europe, and Latin America , EIFL enables access to knowledge for education, learning, research and sustainable community development.
Join us in supporting EIFL and make a donation today. Together we will grow EIFL’s global network and raise the standard of education & living for people in developing and transition countries for many generations to come.
 

_______________________________________________
http://www.eifl.net

——————-

[IFLA-L] Now available at Project MUSE – CJILS 37:2, June 2013

Canadian Journal of Information and Library Science
Volume 37, Number 2, June/juin 2013

This issue contains:

Articles

Instruction for Information Literacy in Canadian Academic Libraries: A Longitudinal Analysis of Aims, Methods, and Success / L’enseignement visant les compétences informationnelles dans les bibliothèques universitaires canadiennes : Une analyse longitudinale des objectifs, des méthodes et du succès obtenu
Heidi Julien, Maria Tan, Shannon Merillat

Abstract:
This study reports a survey of information literacy instruction practices in Canadian academic libraries. Read more
Résumé:
Cet article fait état d’une enquête sur les pratiques d’enseignement visant l’acquisition de compétences informationnelles dans les bibliothèques universitaires canadiennes. Lire plus

A Quasi-experimental Evaluation of an Early Literacy Program at the Regina Public Library / Évaluation quasi-expérimentale d’un programme d’alphabétisation des jeunes enfants à la bibliothèque publique de Regina
Scott Graham, André Gagnon

Abstract:
Public libraries play an important role in the provision of free, interactive, community-based learning opportunities that build the capacity of parents/care-givers to support the development of their children’s early literacy skills. Read more
Résumé:
Les bibliothèques publiques jouent un rôle important dans la prestation de services d’apprentissage gratuits, interactifs et à base communautaire, renforçant les capacités des parents et tuteurs à soutenir le développement des premières compétences de leurs enfants en lecture-écriture. Lire plus

Archives institutionnelles : Observations sur un nouveau mode d’information scientifique / Institutional Repositories: Observations on a New Form of Scientific Information
Joachim Schöpfel, Hélène Prost

Abstract:
Les archives institutionnelles sont devenues un vecteur significatif de la communication scientifique. Aujourd’hui, quatre archives ouvertes sur cinq sont des archives institutionnelles. Read more
Abstract:
Institutional repositories have become an important vector for scientific communication. Today, four out of five open archives are institutional archives. One of their characteristics is their great diversity. Lire plus

User Evaluation of Searchling and T-saurus: Multilingual Thesaurus-Enhanced Visual Interfaces for Digital Libraries / Évaluation par les usagers de Searchling et de T-saurus : Les interfaces visuelles à thesaurus multilingue pour les bibliothèques numériques
Ali Shiri, Stan Ruecker, Matt Bouchard, Lindsay Doll, Carlos Fiorentino

Abstract:
The objective of this paper is to report on a comparative user evaluation of two multilingual thesaurus-enhanced visual user interfaces—namely, T-saurus and Searchling, designed and developed for digital libraries. Read more
Résumé:
L’objectif de cet article est de rendre compte de l’évaluation comparative effectuée par des utilisateurs de deux interfaces utilisateur visuelles multilingues, comportant un thésaurus, nommément T-saurus et Searchling, conçus et développés pour les bibliothèques numériques. Lire plus

Book Reviews

The Embedded Librarian: Innovative Strategies for Taking Knowledge Where it’s Needed by David Shumaker (review)
Devon Greyson

Teach Beyond Your Reach: An Instructor’s Guide to Developing and Running Successful Distance Learning Classes, Workshops, Training Sessions, and More by Robin Neidorf (review)
Vivian Howard

You Don’t Look Like a Librarian: Shattering Stereotypes and Creating Positive New Images in the Internet Age by Ruth Kneale (review)
Pearl Jacobson

 
A respected source of the most up-to-date research on library and information science, The Canadian Journal of Information and Library Science is recognized internationally for its authoritative bilingual contributions to the field of information science. Established in 1976, the journal is dedicated to the publication of research findings, both in full-length and in brief format; reviews of books; software and technology; and letters to the editor.
About Project MUSE
Project MUSE is a unique collaboration between libraries and publishers, providing 100% full-text, affordable and user-friendly online access to a comprehensive selection of prestigious humanities and social sciences journals. MUSE’s online journal collections support a diverse array of research needs at academic, public, special and school libraries worldwide.
For more information about The Canadian Journal of Information and Library Scienceor for submissions information, please contact:
University of Toronto Press – Journals Division
5201 Dufferin St.
Toronto, ON M3H 5T8

Tel: (416) 667-7810
Fax: (416) 667-7881
E-mail:
journals@utpress.utoronto.ca
Website: www.utpjournals.com/cjils
Join us on Facebook  www.facebook.com/utpjournals       
Join us for advance notice of tables of contents of forthcoming issues, author and editor commentaries and insights, calls for papers and advice on publishing in our journals. Become a fan and receive free access to articles weekly through UTPJournals focus.

——————————-

E-Books – Cambridge Books Online

Please go to link below:

CBO July Flyer

————————————-

[EIFL-all] EIFL Newsletter No. 64 – July – August 2013

Having problems reading this email? Please click here to view online version

EIFL letterhead image

No. 64 – July – August 2013

 

EIFL-Licensing Update

EIFL has signed a renewal agreement with Oxford University Press for Oxford Handbooks Online. The agreement runs to 31 December 2015.
EIFL has signed a renewal agreement with Oxford University Press for Oxford Scholarship Online. The agreement runs to 31 December 2015.
EIFL has signed a renewal agreement with Nature Publishing Group for Nature Publishing Group Journals. The agreement runs to 31 December 2016.
 

EIFL-OA Update

EIFL and CHAIN-REDS signed a Memorandum of Understanding to promote the adoption of consolidated standards in the e-Infrastructures for Research and Education, with the ultimate aim of widening the opportunities of data sharing across different e-Infrastructures and continents (Asia, Africa, Europe and Latin America ).
Iryna Kuchma, EIFL Open Access Programme Manager was presented with the 2012 Open Access Award during a conference in Uganda . This is Electronic Publishing Trust for Development (EPT)’s 2nd Annual Award, in ‘recognition of the effort made by individuals working in the developing and emerging countries in the furtherance of open access to scholarly publications’.
The Consortium of Uganda University Libraries (CUUL) in partnership with EIFL and the Regional Universities Forum for Capacity Building in Agriculture (RUFORUM) organised the first national conference on “Open access (OA), knowledge sharing and sustainable scholarly communication in Uganda ” in Kampala .
Mykolas Romeris University , Lithuania , has been actively involved in the open access movement. In June 2013 it adopted an open access policy and launched its open access institutional repository to ensure open access to the scientific production of the University.
Funding has been granted to 10 projects in Africa, Asia, and Europe: three projects in Africa (in Ethiopia , Lesotho and Senegal ), a project in Asia (in China ) and six projects in Europe ( Armenia , Belarus , Estonia , Moldova , Poland and Serbia ).
 

EIFL-IP Update

“This is not the end of a process, but the start of an era – an era of hope that the blight of the book famine may finally be coming to an end”. EIFL closing statement delivered in Marrakesh on 27 June 2013 on the new WIPO Treaty for print disabled people.
In June 2013 after an intense negotiation, Least Developed Countries (LDCs) were granted an extension of the transition period for implementation of the WTO Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS). EIFL and other NGOs were however dismayed at the EU press release that followed.
Read the impressive achievements of eight EIFL-IP projects in Africa, Asia and Europe . Check how the strategies and tactics can be applied in any country.
 

EIFL-PLIP Update

Farmers in Uganda are consulting plant doctors about plant pests and diseases; learning about new farming methods in local languages and using information and communication technology to share knowledge. Read the results of three public library agricultural services supported by EIFL-PLIP.
With EIFL-PLIP support, two libraries in Kenya and Ghana are using computers and the internet to help struggling schoolchildren improve their school results and pass exams.
Public Library Radislav Nikčević in Jagodina , Serbia , has won a prestigious ERSTE Foundation Award for Social Integration 2013, for its AgroLib-Ja service which improves farmers’ lives. The service was launched in 2010 with support from EIFL-PLIP.
Congratulations to the two libraries that won the EIFL-PLIP Innovation Award – for library services that use information and communication technology (ICT) to empower women and girls.
We take pleasure in sharing the results of two library health services funded by EIFL-PLIP in Africa . The services, in Ghana and Uganda , use information and communication technology (ICT) – including mobile phone text messaging (SMS), the internet and radio – to help build healthy communities.
 

Events

 
3 Jul 2013
Africa Library Summit 2013. Location: Pretoria – South Africa
8 Jul 2013
DSpace installation programme in Kenya. Location: Various – Kenya
19 Jul 2013
26 Jul 2013
Open access policies in Moldova kick-off meeting. Location: Chisinau – MoldovaMoldova State University Library
29 Jul 2013
WIPO copyright committee (26th session). Location: Geneva – Switzerland
17 Aug 2013
EIFL-PLIP at IFLA 2013. Location: Suntec Singapore International Convention & Exhibition Centre – Singapore
29 Aug 2013
Seminar on OA policy development in Moldova. Location: Chisinau – MoldovaAcademy of Economic Studies Library
 

Keep in touch | About EIFL

 
 RSS
EIFL is an international not-for-profit organisation based in Europe with a global network of partners. Working in collaboration with libraries in more than 60 developing and transition countries in Africa, Asia, Europe, and Latin America , EIFL enables access to knowledge for education, learning, research and sustainable community development.
Join us in supporting EIFL and make a donation today. Together we will grow EIFL’s global network and raise the standard of education & living for people in developing and transition countries for many generations to come.
 

_______________________________________________
http://www.eifl.net

eiflall mailing list – eiflall@lists.eifl.net

————————————-

[IFLA-L] JLIS.it, New Issue Published

Dear JLIS.it Reader,we are pleased to inform you that JLIS.it has just published its latest
issue at http://leo.cilea.it/index.php/jlis.

You are invited to take a look at the Table of Contents shown below and then
visit the journal web site to read articles of your interest.

Thank you for the continuing interest in our work,
Mauro Guerrini, JLIS.it editor
Gianfranco Crupi, JLIS.it co-editor

JLIS.it
Vol 4, No 2 (2013)
Table of Contents
http://leo.cilea.it/index.php/jlis/issue/view/554

Essays
——–
The use of the Nuovo Soggettario for semantic indexing of web resources:
issues and proposals (1-20)
Elisa Bianchi,  Maria Clotilde Camboni, Elena Lazzarini
Digital editions as a new model of conceptual authority data (21-44)
Francesca Tomasi
Author rights in the digital era: a pilot on behaviours, social perception
and consciousness (45-83)
Simone Aliprandi
Towards a new model of OPAC. From information to knowledge. (85-107)
Antonella Iacono
Development of a metadata schema describing Institutional Repository content
objects enhanced by ”LODE-BD” strategies (109-144)
Iryna Solodovnik
Usage of Reference Management Software at the University of Torino
Enrico Francese
Obtaining the Dewey Decimal Classification Number from other databases: a
catalog clean-up project (175-200)
Stefano Bargioni,      Michele Caputo, Alberto Gambardella,    Luigi Gentile
Libraries and law firms in Italy (201-221)
Ewelina Melnarowicz,    Federica Vignati

Making the Point on
——–
Rights management in digitization projects: public domain and orphan works
(223-254)
Maria Cassella

Reports & Reviews
——–
In search of Meaning: The Written Word in the Age of Google (255-265)
Anita Paz

Lectio magistralis in biblioteconomia
——–
Collection development in the digital age (267-273)
Klaus Kempf

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[IFLA-L] Library theory and Research (LTR) Newsletter : June 2013

Dear colleagues,The last issue of the LTR’s newsletter is now available : http://www.ifla.org/node/7808See you soon at Singaporebest regards,Raphaëlle BATS
Mission Relations internationales
International Relations Office
raphaelle.bats@enssib.frEnssib
http://www.enssib.fr
17-21 bd du 11 novembre 1918
69 623 villeurbanne Cedextel : 04.72.44.75.98

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New Services and Products for Libraries


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Purchase APA Scholarly and Professional Book Content

APA Books E-Collections include select titles from 2001 to 2013, grouped into collections by copyright year. The collections encompass book content in psychology and related disciplines (including medicine, psychiatry, and nursing, among others). They also feature the exclusive electronic release of current copyright-year books.
Click here to learn more.

Ares e-reserve system—designed to work the way you work

Exceed expectations with Ares. Easily manages and tracks copyright. Integrates with other library and campus systems. Mirrors the look and feel you already know with ILLiad to support cross-training with ILL staff. Includes Unicode support, addon capabilities, and enhancements every 6 months. Learn more at Atlas Booth #1512 or on our website.

The MLIS and Beyond: Take the Next Step!

Ready to advance your career? Dominican’s GSLIS offers innovative programs for every level of librarianship: an ALA-accredited MLIS, four certificates (Youth Services, Archival and Cultural Heritage Resources and Services, Informatics, and Knowledge Management), a Master of Professional Studies degree, and our three-year, nonresidential doctoral program. Flexible scheduling options include courses on the weekends, in the evenings, on our River Forest Campus, and an online or hybrid format. Learn more by clicking here.

Libraries are Adapting to Their Environment – So Should the Librarians

The iSchool @ Drexel University boasts a number of highly ranked programs, including Health Librarianship (#5), Digital Librarianship (#6), and Information Systems (#3). U.S. News & World Report 2013 ranked Drexel’s online graduate library science program as one of the 10 best in the country. Learn more on the iSchool website.

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Use your ALA membership for an exclusive discount from GEICO.

GEICO has been helping people save money on insurance for 75 years. Today, GEICO has over 10 million policyholders and a 97% satisfaction rate. That’s a lot of pleased customers – and you could be one too! Get a quote with GEICO, and mention your ALA membership for an exclusive discount. Visit the GEICO website for more information.

Go mobile with Infor Libraries NOW

Infor Libraries NOW is both a mobile website and an app. Give your users quick and easy access to the information they want to know. The mobile catalog is created for your library using industry standard protocols such as Z39.50 and SIP2. We also can integrate existing mobile catalogs from other vendors. Learn more at ALA booth 1524 or visit our website.

The Best of Content and Discovery!

Innovative Interfaces and EBSCO have partnered to create Encore Synergy with EBSCO Discovery Service. Now you can provide one-search access to your local materials and the most comprehensive collection of full-text articles available. Click here to download the fact sheet.

More reasons to love Kingsley®: FREE SHIPPING ON EVERYTHING!

All libraries and schools that place orders directly on kingsley.com will receive FREE FREIGHT….from curbside returns, to thru walls, to carts, to inside returns, to book trucks…and everything else on kingsley.com there’s no freight charges on all orders placed now through August 31st. Save BIG BUCKS Now!!! For more information click here.

The first. The only. Language learning through film.

Ready for an undeniably unique learning experience? Mango Languages’ newest product, Mango Premiere, is the first and only language resource to teach through film. And it’s just one part of an amazing subscription. Stop by booth 1440 at ALA to get beta access or follow the link for an exclusive preview. Learn more by visiting the website.

MS&R is at the forefront of library planning and design

31 years. 181 libraries in 32 states (plus the District of Columbia and United Arab Emirates). More than 10 million square feet of library space. MS&R’s architects and interior designers believe in community and the ability of libraries to improve lives. With MS&R, there is no design tuition to pay. We know and love libraries. For more information click here.

OCLC’s cooperative library management service community is growing globally

More than 100 libraries are live on OCLC’s WorldShare Management Services (WMS)! These libraries helped move WMS from concept to pilot to “live” and many joined OCLC in the celebration. See how through cooperation, libraries can switch to WMS and “have a ball” as part of the WorldShare community by clicking here.

Trusted and Authoritative Humanities and Social Science Content

Project MUSE provides 100% full-text digital access to over 550 journals and 23,000 books from many of the world’s most distinguished university presses and scholarly publishers. All journal and book content is mobile-accessible and DRM-free, with no limitations on usage, downloading, or printing. Come see us at booth #436 at the ALA Annual Conference or visit our website here.

OneClickDigital

Exclusive content and simultaneous-access eAudio with OneClickdigital

Exclusive content and simultaneous-access eAudio with OneClickdigital OneClickdigital, from Recorded Books, an easy-to-use website and platform for eAudio, provides one-click download and transfer to portable devices. Over 25,000 titles include exclusive e-content and simultaneous-access. Mobile apps, flexible pricing options, patron support, and much more are featured. eBooks coming soon! Visit booth #644 at ALA or visit our website for more info.

Rutgers is Coming to Chicago!

Soon, we’ll be joining the thousands making their way to the ALA Conference in Chicago. Stop by Booth #560, spin the big wheel, and chat with some of the finest LIS faculty and advisers in the country.Rutgers’ MLIS program blends theory seamlessly with today’s technologies and features specializations in knowledge management, social media, digital libraries and school libraries. Ranked 6th nationally by U.S. News and World Report, the MLIS graduate program fits your lifestyle, whether you are online, on campus or both.Find out more by starting here. There’s still time to apply for the fall program.

The ALL NEW ST ViewScan II – ALA Booth 420

We are proud to introduce the ST ViewScan II at this year’s ALA. The scanner has been given a modern look with significantly updated capabilities! You can scan 35mm to Ultrafiche and everything in between! The ST ViewScan is fully customizable with OCR, Cruise Control and your choice of color! Learn more by clicking here.

SJSU

Get Up-to-Speed on Emerging Technologies: Online Post-Master’s Certificate Program

The online Post Master’s Certificate program at the SJSU information school features six career pathways. Students following the Digital Services and Emerging Technologies career pathway can select five courses, including Web Usability and Information Visualization. Learn more about “Info Vis” from instructor Dr. Michelle Chen in a blog post with link to view webinar. The application deadline for admission in fall 2013 is July 8. Apply Today!

ALL NEW FOR ALL PATRONS. ALL COLLECTIONS. ALL BUDGETS.

Crowley is kicking off scanner debut season in ALA Booth #344! Participate in the first public demos of Qidenus SMART book scanner, UScan+ microform reader/printer and Mekel MACH 12 rollfilm scanner. Try out the popular Zeutschel zeta and 12002 copy systems. Stop by for show specials. Want an early look? Call (240) 215-0224. Visit the website here.

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Please note: Advertising in ALA publications does not represent an endorsement by ALA.

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Library Connect Monthly – Mendeley, open access, SLA 2013

Mendeley and librarians building bridges to make academic researchers more social and more productive
An interview with Dr. William Gunn, Mendeley’s Head of Academic Outreach

In this article, William Gunn discusses Mendeley as an academic social network, the librarian’s role in teaching researchers to use Mendeley, and how librarians themselves are using Mendeley to connect with colleagues with similar professional interests. Click on the links below to watch a topical video of the interview.

VIDEO: Part 1 – Collaboration
“If we were on Facebook, we’d have to describe the historical Mendeley-Elsevier relationship as “It’s complicated.”

VIDEO: Part 2 – The academic social network
“Social networks get better as the scale of them grows. So when you combine a research network of our scale and the world’s largest science publisher, great things are probably going to happen.”

VIDEO: Part 3 – Which social tool?
“I use Twitter as the scaffolding on which other interactions hang, but then when I have those more substantial interactions, they tend to happen somewhere like Mendeley.”

VIDEO: Part 4 – Mendeley and librarians
“… it’s really been neat to take librarians on as advisors and bridge the varying needs.”

The Journal of Academic Librarianship focuses on open access with its sample issue
By Wendi Arant Kaspar and Wyoma vanDuinkerken, Texas A&M University
The first issue of 2013 focused on the open access debate. The new editors strove to communicate the diversity of opinions and experiences that the topic merits. Those invited to contribute were not only librarians but publishers, policymakers and academic professionals in a variety of disciplines.

Click here for the open access issue of The Journal of Academic Librarianship on ScienceDirect. This is a free sample issue so a subscription is not needed for access to the articles.

Open access: Current developments, future perspectives
By Alicia Wise, Director of Universal Access, Elsevier
When I talk about OA, it is often to consider the implications for researchers: choosing where to publish, affording article publishing charges, or considering new policies and mandates. Speaking at the ALA Midwinter Meeting provided a great opportunity to think about these changes from a librarian’s perspective.

Click here to watch the video of Alicia’s talk at Elsevier’s 2013 Digital Libraries Symposium at ALA Midwinter.

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[IFLA-L] IFLA and Other Access to Information Campaigners Welcome UN Development Report

Dear Colleagues
Yesterday saw the publication of a report by the High Level Panel of Eminent Persons on the Post-2015 Development Agenda. The report sets out to make recommendations on the development agenda beyond 2015. It calls for a ‘data and information revolution’ and puts transparency, accountability and poor people’s participation in decision-making and implementation at the heart of the new framework. The recommendations would enable citizen and policy makers to track goals set by governments and hold them responsible for their actions.
IFLA welcomes the report for as we believe better access to information will reduce corruption, improve decision-making and allocation of resources, empower citizens and support good governance: all prerequisites for successful poverty reduction. For more information, please see: http://www.ifla.org/node/7720
 
 
Kind regards,
Stuart
Stuart Hamilton
Director of Policy and Advocacy
International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA)
P.O. Box 95312
2509 CH The Hague
Netherlands

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[IFLA-L] IFLA launches cultural heritage resources

Dear all,IFLA is pleased to launch a new set of resources relating to libraries and cultural heritage.

The new webpages look at the work and support given by libraries to areas experiencing conflict, war, or natural disasters. They highlight the importance of cultural heritage in the continuity of rebuilding and reestablishing a community after disaster strikes.

Furthermore they share the work of other organisations working in the field, highlight what IFLA is doing to secure cultural heritage whenever possible, and give you a chance to get involved.You can access the new pages here:http://www.ifla.org/cultural-heritage
 
It is our intention to build these resources over time. We would welcome feedback on the pages.Please feel free to inform your network about our new pages and do not hesitate to contact us with questions or suggestions.
Julia Brungs
Policy and Projects Officer
International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA)
P.O. Box 95312
2509 CH The Hague
Netherlands
Phone: 0031703140884

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[IFLA-L] Reference & information Services Blog Update

Dear All,We have just published two new articles on our blog:  Please do take a look and we welcome any comments.
·       The National Library of South Africa: Information Access Programme
 
·       Introducing Bibliotherapy in Public Libraries for the Development of Health and Social Conditions of the Post War Community in Jaffna District (Sri Lanka)- An Exploratory Study
 

Kind regards,
Sara Gube-josefsson
RISS Blog Master

Jane Weller
RISS Secretary
 

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EIFL-all] EIFL Newsletter No. 63 – May – June 2013

Having problems reading this email? Please click here to view online version

EIFL letterhead image

No. 63 – May – June 2013

 

EIFL update

Another highly productive and rewarding year has been made possible thanks to ongoing collaboration with over 60 partner and project countries and the continued support of our funders. The 2012 annual report is now available for viewing and downloading.
A big thank you to everyone who donated to Volta Regional Library’s innovative mobile library service, which takes fully-charged laptop computers to schools in Ho, Ghana to help 450 schoolchildren pass their exams.
EIFL has won a WSIS Project Prize for excellence in supporting achievement of an inclusive, development-oriented information society. EIFL won in the ‘ Capacity Building ‘ category, for the work of the EIFL Public Library Innovation Programme (EIFL-PLIP). The prestigious award was presented at the opening ceremony of the WSIS Forum 2013, attended by delegates from over 140 countries.
 

EIFL-Licensing Update

EIFL has signed a renewal agreement with Cambridge University Press for Cambridge Journals Online. The agreement runs to 31 December 2013.
EIFL has signed a new agreement with Credo Reference Ltd for Credo Online Reference Service, Academic Core Collection. The agreement runs until 31 December 2015, and is open to members of all EIFL-partner consortia in 27 countries.
EIFL has signed a renewal agreement with Oxford University Press for the Oxford Textbook of Medicine Online. The agreement runs to 31 December 2015.
EIFL has signed a renewal agreement with Oxford University Press for Grove Art Online and Grove Music Online. The agreement runs to 31 December 2015.
 

EIFL-OA Update

EIFL joins the likes of Public Library of Science (PLOS), Wellcome Trust, and Google in launching the Accelerating Science Award Program (ASAP), which recognizes the use of scientific research, published through Open Access, that has led to innovations in any field that benefit society. The nomination period is open from May 1 to June 15, 2013.
The Office of the Publisher at the World Bank is creating a pilot program targeted at exploring interoperability with open access institutional repositories in Africa . The goal of this pilot program is to exchange technical expertise on how the content in a repository can be exposed to be more discoverable and re-usable.
 

EIFL-IP Update

The library community in Armenia has emerged strengthened following an intensive campaign that has led to new partnerships and a new found confidence in their ability to participate in national policy-making.
The seventh translation of CFL – in Serbian – is available in print and online from PHAIDRA, the University of Belgrade ‘s digital repository undertaken as part of an EU Tempus funded project.
Libraries in Estonia landed a spot on the main evening news when their newly developed position on copyright was presented at “Digital Memory”, a library seminar organized for the national debate on copyright law.
New resource page on libraries, education and RROs.
To coincide with World IP Day – theme “Creativity: the next generation”, we published the fourth case study with the results of advocacy campaigns that shows how libraries in Uzbekistan are advocating for a legal framework that respects the purpose of copyright – to encourage creativity and learning – and supports technological change for the next generation of pioneers who will change our world.
 

EIFL-FOSS Update

NewGenLib is a FOSS Integrated Library Management System software. A webinar to introduce it, provide an overview and a case study of its deployment was held in March 2013.
 

EIFL-PLIP Update

Utena A. and M. Miskiniai Public Library in Lithuania has received funding to expand their innovative Play to Study service, which includes an educational computer game for vulnerable children, to more than 50 schools in nine municipalities, reaching 7,000 children.
The Beyond Access partnership has published a brief outlining the potential of public libraries to contribute to the social, economic, and civic development goals of Myanmar .
Northern Regional Library’s Technology for Maternal Health Project for mothers-to-be in northern Ghana, which was initiated with support from EIFL-PLIP, is to be scaled up to reach a wider area and to produce maternal health messages in local languages and in audio format. The expansion follows receipt of a US$220,000 grant by the library’s partner organization, Savana Signatures.
Congratulations to the three public libraries that won the EIFL-PLIP award for services that contribute to open government and e-government.
 

Library consortia news

Fiji joins EIFL network of partner countries.
 

Events

 
7 May 2013
COAR Annual Meeting 2013. Location: Istanbul – Turkey
13 May 2013
EIFL at WSIS Forum 2013. Location: Geneva – Switzerland
13 May 2013
Albanian consortium meeting. Location: Tirana – Albania
16 May 2013
21 May 2013
Conference on Open Access in Uganda. Location: Kampala – Uganda
28 May 2013
30 May 2013
EIFL at eLearning Africa 2013. Location: Windhoek – Namibia
31 May 2013
International Conference on Children and Youth Literature. Location: Buenos Aires , Argentina / Santiago , Chile
16 Jun 2013
WIPO Diplomatic Conference for VIPs. Location: Marrakesh – Morocco
16 Jun 2013
EIFL-PLIP at the Next Library 2013 conference. Location: Aarhus – Denmark
18 Jun 2013
OAI8 DSpace User Group Meeting, Geneva. Location: Genève – Switzerland
19 Jun 2013
OAI8 Workshop in Geneva. Location: Genève – Switzerland
 

Keep in touch | About EIFL

 
 RSS
EIFL is an international not-for-profit organisation based in Europe with a global network of partners. Working in collaboration with libraries in more than 60 developing and transition countries in Africa, Asia, Europe, and Latin America , EIFL enables access to knowledge for education, learning, research and sustainable community development.
Join us in supporting EIFL and make a donation today. Together we will grow EIFL’s global network and raise the standard of education & living for people in developing and transition countries for many generations to come.
 

_______________________________________________

[IFLA-L] Fw: Public review announced for digital preservation standards

 

Best Practices & Guidelines for Production of Preservable e-Records

The Best practices and Guidelines in this document are applicable for those e-records that need to be retained for long durations (e.g. 10 years, 25 years, 50 years and beyond) and the e-records that need to be preserved permanently. The core concepts of ‘preservability’ are based on the requirements specified in IT ACT, ISO/TR 15489-1 and 2 Information Documentation – Records Management and ISO 14721 Open Archival Information Systems (OAIS) Reference Model

The draft digital preservation standards are now published by e-gov standards division for public review on its website.

Please check the announcements section on top right corner at the URL below –

http://egovstandards.gov.in/

 http://egovstandards.gov.in/review-documents/public-review/Draft_Production_of_Preservable_e-Records_Best_Practices_Ver.0.1.pdf/view

 

The last date for giving of feedback is May 31, 2013. Pl. feel free to circulate it to all concerned.

 

Regards

Ramesh

 

**************************************
Dr. Ramesh C Gaur
PGDCA, MLISc,Ph.D. Fulbright Scholar (Virginia Tech, USA)
University Librarian
Jawaharlal Nehru University(JNU)
New Meharuli Road, New Delhi – 110067
Tele +91-11-26742605, 26704551
Fax : +91-11-26741603
Email: rcgaur@mail.jnu.ac.in ;rcgaur66@gmail.com
URL: www.jnu.ac.in
Brief Profile: http://www.jnu.ac.in/Library/RameshCGaur.htm

 

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[IFLA-L] Alexandria 23,2 – now available online

*Apologises for Cross Posting*
 
Now available online.
 
Alexandria:The Journal of National and International Library and Information Issues
Volume 23, Issue 2, August 2012
 
 
The issue includes:
 
Editorial
Monica Blake
DOI: 10.7227/ALX.23.2.1
 
Europeana: Digital Access to Europe’s Cultural Heritage
Jonathan Purday
DOI: 10.7227/ALX.23.2.2
 
National Implementations of Legal Deposit
Andy Stephens, Richard Gibby
DOI: 10.7227/ALX.23.2.3
 
Social Media in Libraries: It’s Like, Complicated
Nick Canty
DOI: 10.7227/ALX.23.2.4
 
The 2012 Global RFID Survey
Mick Fortune
DOI: 10.7227/ALX.23.2.5
 
Revolutionary Libraries: Building Collections and Promoting Research about the January 25th Uprising in Egypt
Carolyn Runyon, Meggan Houlihan
DOI: 10.7227/ALX.23.2.6
 
News Round-up
DOI: 10.7227/ALX.23.2.7
 
Book Reviews
Peter Hoare, Hermann Rösch, Sylvia Simmons
DOI: 10.7227/ALX.23.2.8
 
 
As its subtitle states Alexandria focuses on national and international library and information issues. It is concerned with both policy and practice. It accepts descriptive articles on particular national or major research libraries, or on the situation within a country or a region with regard to such matters as bibliographic networks, cooperative information provision, document delivery and national information planning. Discussion papers are also welcomed on national issues such as national retention and preservation policies, the promotion of national library services, and the response of national and major research. Alexandria would also welcome papers on issues such as digital curation, the management of digital collections and wider curatorial issues, including those affecting the archive and museum sectors.
 
 
For more information on Alexandria, including submission guidelines and subscription recommendations, please see the journals website: http://www.manchesteruniversitypress.co.uk/cgi-bin/scribe?showinfo=ip014%20
 
To sign up to Table of Content alerts, see here: https://manchester.metapress.com/content/122737/toc-alert
 
Posted by Meredith Carroll, Manchester University Press
————————-
[IFLA-L] New IFLA Publication: Open Access and Digital Libraries: Social Science Libraries in Action / Acceso Abierto y Bibliotecas Digitales: Bibliotecas de Ciencias Sociales en Acción

 
New IFLA Publication
 
Just off the press as Nr 158 in the IFLA Publications Series…
 
 
The social sciences have made fundamental contributions to the understanding of the economic, political and social life of nations in the past century. Social science libraries now have an important role to play in the context of the information society as significant sources of academic and social knowledge. This work provides information on the development and use of digital resources in the social sciences emphasizing best practices; an articulation of some of the problems presented to providing these resources; and a view to the use of these resources to support sustainable development.
Las ciencias sociales han hecho contribuciones fundamentales para la comprensión de la vida económica, política y social de las naciones durante el siglo pasado. Las bibliotecas de ciencias sociales actualmente tienen un papel importante que desplegar en el contexto de la sociedad de la información como fuentes sustanciales de conocimiento social y académico. El presente trabajo proporciona información acerca del desarrollo y uso de los recursos digitales en las ciencias sociales con énfasis en las mejores prácticas; una referencia de algunas de las dificultades existentes para proporcionar estos recursos; y una mirada al uso de estos recursos en función del desarrollo sostenible.
Open Access and Digital Libraries: Social Science Libraries in Action / Acceso Abierto y Bibliotecas Digitales: Bibliotecas de Ciencias Sociales en Acción
Edited by: Lynne M. Rudasill & Maria E. Dorta-Duque
Berlin/Munich: De Gruyter Saur, 2013
ISBN 978-3-11-028102-6
(IFLA Publications; Nr 158)
Euro 99,95 / for USA, Canada, Mexico US$ 140.00
Special price for IFLA members Euro 79,95 / for USA, Canada, Mexico US$ 112.00

De Gruyter Saur Verlag                                                For the USA – Canada – Mexico


Rhenus Medien Logistik GmbH & Co.
KG                      Walter de Gruyter, Inc.
Justus-von-Liebig-Straße 1                                            P.O. Box 960
86899 Landsberg, Germany                                          
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Fax: +49 (0)8191 9 70 00-560                                         Fax: +1 (703) 661-1501
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to unsubscribe to IFLA-L, please visit: http://infoserv.inist.fr/wwsympa.fcgi/sigrequest/ifla-l
 
 
 

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[IFLA-L] Out now: March 2013 issue of IFLA Journal

Latest issue of IFLA Journal: Volume 39, No. 1 (March 2013) available at: http://www.ifla.org/node/7637CONTENTS:Editorial: More from Helsinki
Stephen Parker 3ARTICLESPoverty alleviation through strategic public library services in Nigeria in the 21st century: a model Bappah Magaji Abubakar 4Uniting the corpus of our collections through visualization Alex Byrne 15User-centered decision making: a new model for developing academic library services and systems Lynn Silipigni Connaway, Erin M. Hood, Donna Lanclos, David White and Alison Le Cornu 20Re-training of librarians for the digital work environment by the Nigerian Library Association Ezra Shiloba Gbaje 30Locating librarianship’s identity in its historical roots of professional philosophies: towards a radical new identity for librarians of today (and tomorrow) Sara Wingate Gray 37Form@doct: Designing innovative online tutorials for PhD students in France Marie-Laure Malingre, Alexandre Serres, Alain Sainsot and Herve´ Le Men 45Libraries supporting national development goals in Namibia Ellen Ndeshi Namhila and Ritva Niskala 58Academic librarians and research data services: preparation and attitudes Carol Tenopir, Robert J. Sandusky, Suzie Allard and Ben Birch 70THE PRESIDENT-ELECT’S THEMEStrong libraries, strong societies
Sinikka Sipilä 79NEWS 80ABSTRACTS 83
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[IFLA-L] Emerald announces further open access LIS articles through special partnership with IFLA

Dear colleagues
Emerald Group Publishing Limited is delighted to announce the next batch of articles available in open access as part of its ‘special partnership’ with IFLA. The articles, available to download from www.emeraldinsight.com/tk/iflaoa2013, are published in several of Emerald’s well-respected LIS journals, including Interlending & Document Supply, Library Hi Tech News, Performance Measurement and Metrics, Library Management and Library Review.Under this agreement, papers that have their origins in an IFLA conference or project, have the opportunity to be published in one of Emerald’s LIS journals and become open access nine months after publication. This special partnership takes advantage of the Emerald platform to increase the discoverability of research presented at IFLA events.Regards
Eileen Breen
Executive Publisher | Emerald Group Publishing Limited
Tel: +44 (0) 1274 785172 | Fax: +44 (0)1274 785200
ebreen@emeraldinsight.com | www.emeraldinsight.com
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[IFLA-L] Pak LIS Research Portal

Dear Colleagues,To meet the long standing need of a one window provision of resources on LIS research in Pakistan we have launchedPak LIS Research Portal at http://www.paklisresearch.org/I hope you will find this site useful in your research endeavors.I am thankful to our team particularly Abid Iqbal, Shakil Ahmed, Muhammad Tufail Khan and Shahar Bano Faizi for their efforts.I request all of you to offer your support to maintain this portal and give your suggestions to improve it.Best regards,Khalid Mahmood, PhD
Professor of Library & Information Science, University of the Punjab, Lahore, PAKISTAN
President, Pakistan Library Association
Chief Editor, Pakistan Journal of Library & Information Science
Cell: +92-333-4271285
Email: khalidmahmood@yahoo.com and khalid.dlis@pu.edu.pk
Internet: http://pu.edu.pk/faculty/description/96/Dr-Khalid-Mahmood.html
———————————–

[IFLA-L] New issue of SLIS Connecting available online

The new February 2013 issue of the open-source e-journal SLIS Connecting is now available at http://aquila.usm.edu/slisconnecting/
In February of 2012, the first issue of SLIS Connecting was published online in Southern Miss’ digital repository Aquila: http://aquila.usm.edu/slisconnecting/. The purpose of the journal is to share news, information and research with future students, current students, alumni, faculty, and the general population through selected faculty publications, invited student publications, refereed publications, and through regular columns. In the first year, we published two issues with a total of 19 records. In just one year, these 19 records have been downloaded a total of 4547 times. In the first six months, there were over 5000 page views including 82% from within the U.S and 18% from international locations. Of the 1,098 international page views, they were from 107 international cities in 68 countries.

Teresa S. Welsh, Ph.D., Associate Professor
School of Library & Information Science
University of Southern Mississippi
118 College Drive #5146
Hattiesburg, MS 39406-0001Co-Managing Editor, SLIS Connecting
http://aquila.usm.edu/slisconnecting/Information Literacy in the Digital Age: An Evidence-Based Approach
by T.S. Welsh and M.S. Wright (Chandos, 2010)
http://www.neal-schuman.com/bdetail.php?isbn=9781843345152
http://www.woodheadpublishing.com/en/book.aspx?bookID=1987&ChandosTitle=1British Summer Studies LIS Course, Summer 2013
http://www.usm.edu/library-information-science/british-studiesPhone: 601.296.0528
Fax: 601.266.5774
http://www.usm.edu/library-information-science/faculty/dr-teresa-s-welsh
http://ocean.otr.usm.edu/%7Ew146169/
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Dear Colleagues,we are pleased to bring you our Section’s February 2013 Newsletter.  Here is a glimpse of what to expect:·          Australia’s new take on the fun mobile library – Pg 4
·          Afghan children learn about cultures in different countries – Pg 6
·          A national reading campaign for children and youths in Singapore – Pg 7
·          Helping young children navigate the library for information in Turkey – Pg 10
·          Children making links with other cultures through poetry – Pg 13
·          Beautiful Librarian photo project & the 2nd Youth Book Week, Russia – Pg 16

·          Sweden at the Bologna Book Fair in March 2013 – Pg 18
·          Reading as a link between generations – Pg 24

Here is the link – ENJOY! :
http://www.ifla.org/publications/libraries-for-children-and-young-adults-section-newsletter

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IFLA launches principles, research and advice for eLending in Libraries

IFLA is pleased to launch a new set of resources relating to eBooks and libraries. Providing access to eBooks is one of the most pressing issues facing libraries right now. Public libraries, in particular, are dealing with implications of rapidly changing business and access models. IFLA has previously issued a background paper on eLending during 2012, and is now building on this paper to launch a new official policy document ‘IFLA Principles for Library eLending‘ which was endorsed by the Governing Board in February 2013.
In addition, the new webpages contain links to the background paper, and a commissioned thinkpiece on eBooks in libraries, both of which are intended to further the debate around the subject and provide interested colleagues with further information. There are links to existing campaigns on eBooks, and further details on how to get involved in IFLA’s work on the issue.
The plan is to build on these resources during 2013 and expand the amount of information available. The Principles will be discussed at the MLAS Seminar on eBooks in Libraries on February 21st 2013 in London.
You can access the new pages here: http://www.ifla.org/e-lending
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Stuart Hamilton
IFLA Director of Policy and Advocacy
[IFLA-L] CPDWL newsletter

Dear all!
The winter edition of the CPDWL newsletter is now available with information from the Helsinki conference, some news about the Singapore WLIC 2013 conference and of course a letter from our co-chairs.
Our Newsletter editor Juanita Jara de Sumár has done a great job on this issue. Read and enjoy!
/Catharina
Information Coordinator, CPDWL

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IFLA: Webology: Volume 9, Number 2, 2012

We are pleased to inform you that Vol. 9, No. 2 of Webology, an OPEN
ACCESS bi-annual journal, is published and available ONLINE now.

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Webology: Volume 9, Number 2, 2012
TOC: http://www.webology.org/2012/v9n2/toc.html
This issue contains:

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Articles

– An assessment of the accessibility of spatial data from the Internet
to facilitate further participation with geographical information
systems for novice indigenous users in South Australia
— Paul A. Corcoran
— Keywords: Spatial data infrastructures; Social inclusion;
International comparison; Internet; Accessibility; Geographical
information systems; Australia
http://www.webology.org/2012/v9n2/a97.html

– Ergonomics of usability/accessibility-ready websites: Tools and guidelines
— Ali Al-Badi, Saqib Ali, and Taiseera Al-Balushi
— Keywords: Website accessibility; Cross-cultural usability;
Usability guidelines; Usability testing; Readability formulae; User
interface design; Local culture; Localized business websites;
Globalization
http://www.webology.org/2012/v9n2/a98.html

– Application of web 2.0 tools by national libraries
— Paramjeet K. Walia, and Monika Gupta
— Keywords: National libraries; Web 2.0;  Social media; RSS; Blog;
Instant messaging; Social networking; World Wide Web
http://www.webology.org/2012/v9n2/a99.html

– Creating a digital footprint as a means of optimizing the personal
branding of librarians in the digital society
— Helen Nneka Eke
— Keywords: Digital footprint; Personal branding; Librarians; Digital
structural change; Digital society
http://www.webology.org/2012/v9n2/a100.html

– Foreigners’ point of view towards collaboration with Iranian authors
— Mahsa Nikzad
— Keywords: Co-authorship; Co-publication;  Scientific collaboration;
Scientometric; Motivations; Non-Iranian authors; Iran
http://www.webology.org/2012/v9n2/a101.html

– Interlending & Document Supply: A bibliometric study from 2001 to 2010
— Dillip K. Swain, Kamal Lochan Jena, & Rabindra K. Mahapatra
— Keywords: Bibliometric; Interlending & Document Supply; Journal
analysis; Citation analysis; Document delivery
http://www.webology.org/2012/v9n2/a102.html

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Book Review
– Teens, librarians, and social networking: What librarians need to
know? / Edited by Denise E. Agosto & June Abbas
— Elaheh Hosseini, & Mohammadamin Erfanmanesh
— Keywords: Information services; Information technologies; Literacy;
Social media; Social networking; Teens; Virtual worlds; Young adults;
Public library services; Librarians
http://www.webology.org/2012/v9n2/bookreview22.html

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Call for Papers
http://www.webology.org/callforpapers.html

=========================================

Best regards,
Alireza Noruzi, Ph.D.
Editor-in-Chief of Webology
Website: http://www.webology.org
~ The great aim of Open Access journals is knowledge sharing. ~
~ Scientific knowledge is the result of the knowledge sharing and
exchange of experiences. ~

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[IFLA-L] Last Issue of the Information World Journal (Volume 13 / Issue 2) and Invitation to Contributions for Next Issue (Volume 14 / Issue 1)

Dear colleagues,

We would like to inform you that we have published last issue of Information World Journal (IWJ – formerly known as Bilgi Dünyası). The last issue of IWJ is available on our web site (http://bd.org.tr/index.php/bd/user/setLocale/en_US). Thanks to the our technology and infrastructure group,  IWJ is now powered with the latest OJS 2.4.1 and a new responsive structure that enables mobile readability of our journal management system embedded to our journal management system.


We also would like to announce that the next issue of the IWJ will be published in April, 2013. Therefore, we would be happy to publish your papers in the IWJ. You can submit your manuscript until March 10, 2013 via our journal management system (http://bd.org.tr/index.php/bd/login).


IWJ is a peer-reviewed international journal dealing with LIS and has been published twice in a year since 2000 by the University and Research Librarians’ Association (UNAK) in Turkey. IWJ publishes (in Turkish or English) original articles on research works, survey articles, opinion papers and book reviews, concerning information, documentation and other library science topics along with professional news and meeting announcements.


IWJ is indexed and abstracted in LISA (Library and Information Science Abstracts); EBSCOHost-LISTA (Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts); IndexCopernicus and Turkish Academic Network and Information Center’s (ULAKBIM) Social Sciences Database. IWJ is an Open Access Journal and listed in DOAJ (Directory of Open Access Journals) and E-LIS (E-Prints in Library and Information Science). Also IWJ is a candidate for Thomson Reuters ISI and SCOPUS.



We are kindly looking forward to seeing your contributions.


Thank you very much in advance


Yours faithfully


Nevzat Özel – Tolga Çakmak
Editors of Information Worl dJournal
{nevzat, tolga}@bd.org.tr

IWJ Vol 13 / No: 2 (2012)
Table of Contents

Refereed Articles


Legal and Ethical Responsibilities for Ensuring Electronic Information Security – [Turkish]
Nazan Uçak, Türkay Henkoğlu – http://bd.org.tr/index.php/bd/article/view/1/pdf_2

Development of Resource Description and Access (RDA): The New Cataloging Standard – [English]
Shahrzad Khosrowpour – http://bd.org.tr/index.php/bd/article/view/2/pdf

Evaluation of the Digitization Efforts of Cultural Memory Institutions in Turkey within the Framework of Intellectual Freedom – [Turkish]
Tolga Çakmak, Bülent Yılmaz – http://bd.org.tr/index.php/bd/article/view/3/pdf_10

Ephemera and its Types as an Information Source – [Turkish]
Şekibe Nihal Somer, İshak Keskin – http://bd.org.tr/index.php/bd/article/view/4/pdf_9

Enterprise Content Management implementation – an overview of phases, standards and best practice guidelines – [English]
Shadrack Katuu – http://bd.org.tr/index.php/bd/article/view/5/pdf_6

The Affect of ICT Towards Reading Attitudes – [Turkish]
Mustafa Türkyılmaz – http://bd.org.tr/index.php/bd/article/view/6/pdf_5

Legislation Related to Electronic Record Interchange Amongst Public Institutions and Things to Do in Public Institutions – [Turkish]
Mehmet Bilge Kağan Önaçan – http://bd.org.tr/index.php/bd/article/view/7/pdf_3

Technical Competencies of Medical and Health Librarians in a Library 2.0 Environment – [English]
Joseph Marmol Yap – http://bd.org.tr/index.php/bd/article/view/8/pdf_13

The Effects of Social Networkıng Sites on Understanding of Information and Privacy of Digital Natives – [Turkish]
Asiye Kakırman Yıldız – http://bd.org.tr/index.php/bd/article/view/9/pdf_4

The Fundamental Elements of the User Oriented Archival Services – Research Environment – [Turkish]
Burçak Şentürk – http://bd.org.tr/index.php/bd/article/view/10/pdf_8

Opinion Papers

Recommendations for Roadmap of Information Management Projects – [Turkish]
Fahrettin Özdemirci, Sabri Alyakut – http://bd.org.tr/index.php/bd/article/view/11/pdf_12

Time Management Strategies for Improving Librarians’ Productivity – [English]
Goodluck Israel Ifijeh – http://bd.org.tr/index.php/bd/article/view/12/pdf_7

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Publishers’ Weekly, Volume 259 Issue 51  – 17 December 2012

E-Books and e-lending
For all the recent attention on e-book lending in the U.S., the problem of libraries being denied access to e-books crosses borders
 
Peter Brantley |
Dec 14, 2012
At a small, invitation-only meeting convened late last month in the Netherlands by the International Federation of Library Associations (IFLA), I joined some 25 key thinkers, primarily from Europe and the U.S., for an exhausting, engrossing three days of debate. But after many hours of discussion and examination—talks that inevitably spilled over into local pubs and restaurants—none of us was left feeling that libraries were firmly seizing control of their future.
Working from the Koninklijke Bibliotheek, the Dutch National Library in the Hague, the three-day meeting agenda drew on the most lucid review I have yet encountered on the play between libraries and publishers: an IFLA commissioned report entitled “Libraries, e-Lending and the Future of Public Access to Digital Content,” written by Dan Mount, of the U.K.’s Civic Agenda, and consultant Paul Sturges. The meeting was intended to help IFLA formulate recommendations on digital lending to its governing board, many of whom attended. The report—among other key resources and findings—is expected to be released publicly in the coming weeks, although it must be noted that none of this yet represents IFLA’s official position on e-books, but rather an independent analysis of the current marketplace for libraries.
As IFLA works to prepare and release its findings, however, attendees at the meeting came away with a sense that time may be running out for libraries. The general consensus among participants was that public libraries have two, maybe three years to establish their relevance in the digital realm, or risk fading from the central place they have long occupied in the world’s literary culture.
A Sad Litany
As the meeting began, we quickly settled into a core aspect of the debate: ownership of digital books. Is ownership necessary, even desirable, or can liberal licensing offer libraries advantages that ownership can’t? If licensing frameworks endorse content portability, interoperability, and permanent access then how necessary is ownership, except for a national library network, like the Library of Congress, where statutory preservation requirements exist? From another perspective, the question is what bundle of rights would public libraries require in order to perform their key services and fulfill their responsibilities? And can those rights be optimally obtained via license or through ownership?
Many in the group felt that a “dual track” could theoretically be pursued—a track that accepts liberal licenses under current copyright models, but also pursues significant copyright reforms that would “modernize” library lending with explicit exceptions and limitations. Such a track could prove difficult to achieve, however, as suggested by a looming struggle in the U.S. Congress over Sections 108 and 109 of the Copyright Act, which cover library uses and first sale rights.
As for how the global library e-book landscape stands now, the group heard a litany of sad stories about negotiations with publishers that have gone awry.
Canada represented the most successful alliance between libraries and publishers. Two years of negotiations with the Association of Canadian Publishers has resulted in a landmark draft proposal for licensing a bundle of e-books, with terms loosely based on the HarperCollins model, but good for 40 loans rather than 26, with each library paying out over five years. The initiative, launched with some government support, is ultimately intended to be self-funding, with an outsourced platform to be chosen through an RFP.
Most representatives, however, told of years of negotiations breaking down in futile stalemates. Relations between Swedish libraries and publishers, for example, soured to such a point that libraries are now engaging in a PR campaign that paints their country’s “next librarian” as a fat-cat, suit-clad publisher.
The Danish case was particularly illustrative. In 2011, while e-books were still an immature market in Denmark, Danish publishers and libraries struck a deal to expand access to e-books using a Bluefire Reader application. The libraries paid publishers about $3 per loan—and over 100,000 individuals took advantage of the trial with over 600,000 loans in the first year—an astounding level for a small country. The experiment was such a success that the largest publishers pulled out—for them, the surge of e-book acceptance and readership from the program generated fears of lost sales. Notably, the project continues with smaller publishers and lending activity remains high.
In Germany, large publishers and libraries were also unable to come to terms, with firms such as Bertelsmann also, predictably, asserting that loans substitute for sales. In a partial accommodation, publishers agreed to “rent” access to e-books but at very high prices. Meanwhile, German publisher manipulation of fixed book pricing laws put the industry in a twist—publishers say that e-books are substitutes for books, and therefore susceptible to fixed price laws. They reiterate, however, that e-books are entirely different from print when it comes to issues of licensing and lending.
One theme was constant: large publishers’ fear of lost sales resulting from library e-book lending. Yet smaller presses and independent distributors continue to demonstrate a willingness to negotiate and work with libraries. That led many around the table to suggest that libraries abandon or at least scale back the urgency surrounding negotiations with the big six. That suggestion, however, was deemed unrealistic by large-city library directors, such as attendee Pat Losinski of the Columbus, Ohio, library system.
What’s Gone Wrong?
On the publishing side, consultant Brian O’Leary, of Magellan Media Partners, offered a succinct analysis of the major publishers’ strategic market position, finding an industry strikingly ill-positioned to respond to new challenges. Large, international trade publishing, he noted, is an industry that lacks a competitive and innovative culture, is historically riddled with cozy relationships, and frustrated by many strong forces—including its own customers, the retailers. Generally speaking, publishing has focused its market response to e-books on a single source of acute pain—the largest retailers like Amazon and Apple—and its only response to market dynamics has been consolidation.
The library e-book distribution market, meanwhile, is currently concentrated in the hands of a single vendor, Overdrive, with little international competition from firms like 3M or Baker & Taylor. And innovation in lending platforms, the group agreed, has been minor, at best—with competing vendors only differentiating themselves on features, rather than working to transform the market.
The continued acceptance of Adobe’s ACS DRM system as the de facto protection measure for e-book lending, the group agreed, also has profound downsides, ranging from high user friction to fairly steep per-loan fees. The alternative, however, requires that libraries develop their own software—not generally a library strength.
What libraries want, what they need, the group noted, is their own open source discovery services akin to Bibliocommons married to an e-book file hosting and management platform that can replace Overdrive with a less intrusive, open-source, interoperable system that can relieve libraries from per-loan fees and excessive setup costs. How’s that for a tall order?
On the final day of the meeting, I, along with O’Leary, Mark Coker of Smashwords, and Tim Coates of Bilbary gathered in conclave with IFLA staff and governing board members. The first half of the morning saw us paint an alluring—but achievable—vision of improved integration between library and publisher supply chains. Among our topics, Coates protested the continued collision between ONIX and MARC systems; O’Leary discussed the near-complete absence of adequate metadata handling in the distribution system; Coker, based on his experience setting up direct purchase options for libraries with Smashwords, opined that publishers should support the exposure of their entire catalogues, providing for simple integration into library acquisition and discovery systems.
O’Leary also delivered a well-reasoned argument that libraries don’t detract from sales, but actually fill a market need where the price is zero. Filling that role makes libraries “the first, best defense against piracy.” In the absence of good libraries, he argued, a serious market failure would arise—a failure that would trigger a truly undesirable consumer response.
After the first two days spent discussing the global state of library e-books, frustrations were so high that more radical solutions were raised. For example, in many European countries, state funds flow to publishers to support literature. Perhaps libraries should advocate for legislatures to require that these funds cycle back to the public by expressly permitting libraries to acquire and lend e-books, through a formal exception if necessary. The U.K.’s Hargreaves Report on Copyright in a Digital Age has already broached this subject, recommending legislative changes to prevent content and licensing agreements from contravening existing exceptions and limitations already available in copyright.
Competition
While there was a lively debate, all of us at the IFLA meeting agreed that libraries are the best footholds that publishers and authors have for connecting with readers. With more than 230,000 public library buildings across the world, libraries possess unparalleled opportunities. Although there is unease as we enter a world of digital content abundance, where collecting may seem paternalistic and unnecessary, and tools for reader feedback and interaction are ubiquitous, we all welcomed a vision of libraries using technology to bring people and their communities together around books.
In the concluding session, we were asked to provide summations and suggestions for IFLA as it begins considering recommendations to its board. With mobile phones and tablets everywhere and more coming every day, what does this digital shift portend? Here our tone turned unsparing.
The most serious threat facing libraries does not come from publishers, we argued, but from e-book and digital media retailers like Amazon, Apple, and Google. While some IFLA staff protested that libraries are not in the business of competing with such companies, the library representatives stressed that they are. If public libraries can’t be better than Google or Amazon at something, then libraries will lose their relevance.
It’s good that the library e-book issue has heated up over the past year, and not just in the U.S. but globally. But libraries have dithered for far too long—it is now time for action. No matter how glorious the vision of local 3D printing, community gaming, or how critical the literacy training and job assistance libraries offer, reading lies at the heart of the library mission—and as the world goes digital, we cannot let the library become a pile of dusty books. We must make the library the most cool and awesome space it has ever been. But absent immediate innovation, libraries are going to be increasingly unable to meet the expectations of their patrons, and if such a breakthrough cannot come in the next two or three years, libraries risk losing their central place in the world of literature. That would be a great loss.

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Digital Textbook Presentations > Belgrade, Serbia > September 2012

In late September 2012, I also had opportunities to present at various venues in Belgrade, Serbia.

The first was prepared for presentation at 11th Conference New Technologies and Standards: Digitization of National Heritage.  However, due to the cancellation of my flight from Vienna, where I had a long layover on my way from Milan, I was not able to deliver it.

McKiernan, Gerry. “Open Access Textbooks: A Survey of Major Initiatives.” Presentation prepared for XI New Technologies and Standards: Digitization of National Heritage 2012Faculty of Mathematics, University of Belgrade, Serbia, September 21, 2012. Self-archived at http://www.public.iastate.edu/~gerrymck/Belgrade-1.ppt  (29 September 2012). Selected.

Fortunately, I was able to re-book my flight to arrive in Belgrade to give a scheduled presentation at the University of Belgrade library.

McKiernan, Gerry. “Digital Textbooks: An Idea Whose Time Has Come.” Presentation given at the University Library “Svetozar Marković”, University of Belgrade, Serbia, September 21, 2012. Self-archived at http://www.public.iastate.edu/~gerrymck/Belgrade-2.ppt  (29 September 2012). Invited.

Video Available At 

[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3xDFDOW4Wbk]

Duration = ~ 57:30 Minutes
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[IFLA-L] South African Journal of Libraries and Information Science Vol 78(1)

Dear LIASA members and all others concerned,
We wish to inform you that Vol. 78 (1) of the South African journal of libraries and information science is now available (sajlis.journals.ac.za). Please note that the journal is now fully open access. Authors submitting papers should register on the on-line system  and submit  their manuscripts electronically. It is also recommended that you register as a reader to automatically get notification when the next issue is published.
The URL for the South African journal of libraries and information science is http://sajlis.journals.ac.za
Kind regards
Associate Professor Jaya Raju (Editor-in-Chief)
Head:  Library and Information Studies Centre, University of Cape Town
 
Dr Reggie Raju and Ms Ina Smith (Journal Managers)
Stellenbosch University
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IFLA-L] French translation of ACD Electronic resource guide now available!

Dear colleagues,
As announced, IFLA’s Acquisition & Collection Development Section is pursuing its translation effort of its E-Resource guide which, in its English version, has now gained much attention in the professional arena worldwide.
Last month we issued the Russian version, and we are now proud to introduce the French version:
With many thanks to our colleague Diane Polnicky, who made it possible, please let me wish you a good read!
Translations in Arabic, Chinese, German, Spanish (IFLA official languages) and Polish are in the making: please stay on alert as you’ll hear from us as the next languages line up!
Sincerely yours,
Jerome FRONTY, ACD information coordinator
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[IFLA-L] New Publication: Newsletter 2012 Winter

The latest IFLA Library Services to Multicultural Populations Section’s Newsletter 2012 Winter has been published.
Jack Leong
Information Officer
IFLA-Library Services to Multicultural Populations Section
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[IFLA-L] IFLA Presidential Newsletter November 2012

web version: http://www.ifla.org/news/ifla-presidential-newsletter-november-2012Dear IFLA Colleagues,Since my last newsletter in May, we’ve been active in regions around the world, representing libraries in many different forums, on the development agenda, and at major regional conferences. In August we met at the IFLA World Library and Information Congress in Helsinki. The Congress was a great success, according to all your feedback. I met many of you in person and heard about all the work across our working groups and sections that makes IFLA such a rich organization.The world’s library community meets in HelsinkiWe welcomed over 4000 participants to the IFLA World Library and Information Congress 2012. It was the biggest IFLA event yet, with participants from 114 countries, including more than 1000 from our host nation, Finland. The National Committee, together with 271 volunteers, were wonderful hosts and made this such a successful event. Congratulations to everyone that took part including all of our officers, volunteers, and our Headquarters staff.The Congress programme was so full and there is not enough space here to mention all of the highlights, but I would particularly like to congratulate all of the people we honoured in the closing ceremony who have done so much for IFLA and our profession. If you know of someone who should be honoured in 2013, the call for nominations is now open.IFLA’s voice in the regionsWhether demonstrating the role of libraries in economic and social development globally, or supporting public libraries in Africa, IFLA’s voice has been strong across the world over the last few months. As well as so many forums where IFLA has been represented, I have had the opportunity most recently to travel to Beijing, Hong Kong and Taipei to meet with members and discuss key issues in their region.Beyond Access focuses on libraries and developmentIFLA participated in the Beyond Access conference held from October 1-3 in Washington DC IFLA has been a partner in the Beyond Access Initiative since its inception at the end of 2011 – it aims to position libraries as agents for development, and draw the attention of policymakers, funders and the development community to the untapped potential of public libraries as partners for delivering development goals. Presenters, including USAID administrator Rajev Shah, and Ricardo Lagos, the 33rd President of Chile, discussed the potential of libraries and awarded prizes to innovative library projects.SCECSAL and the African Public Libraries Summit 2012 strengthen African networksThe 20th Standing Conference of Eastern, Central and South Africa Library and Information Associations (SCECSAL) 2012 conference took place in Nairobi, Kenya in June. With so many leaders attending the conference, a workshop for Presidents of library associations based on the Building Strong Libraries Associations (BSLA) programme was held to share experiences including those of BSLA in Cameroon and in Botswana, and case studies from successful library associations in Nigeria, Ghana and South Africa. The workshop showed just how much growth and activity there is in associations across the continent.In September, the African Public Libraries Summit was the first ever continent-wide convening of public library leaders and policymakers. The summit was supported by the South African Government and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. Under the theme, “Informing Africa, Developing Africa”, delegates discussed the opportunities for creating successful, 21st century public libraries that contribute to the development priorities of African communities, countries and continent. By the end of the summit, thirty-four outcomes were reached, most important among them being the Resolution on the Establishment of an African Public Libraries Network.Whilst in South Africa for the summit, I visited the IFLA Regional Office of Africa, hosted by the UNISA (University of South Africa) Library in Pretoria since 2007. This office plays a major strategic role for IFLA in disseminating information and raising IFLA’s profile in Africa, and I was delighted to renew our agreement with UNISA to host the IFLA Regional office for a further five years.Crimea 2012 celebrates an 1800-year anniversaryThe 2012 Crimea conference included presentations on how countries in the region can contribute to IFLA’s Key Initiatives, including our Copyright Exceptions and Limitations work. Russian participants outlined difficulties with copyright legislation in their country and the changes they want to see to better serve library users. During the conference, IFLA’s Genealogy and Local History Section hosted a special seminar “Silk Road 2012” celebrating the 1800th anniversary of the host city of the Crimea conference – the historic trading port of Sudak on the Black Sea.AFLI strengthens networks across the regionDoha, Qatar hosted the 23rd Conference of the Arab Federation for Libraries and Information (AFLI), providing the opportunity to meet colleagues in the region to discuss a number of professional issues. There is great interest in membership and participation in IFLA in the region, and many colleagues are looking forward to the Congress in Singapore. During my visit, I had the opportunity to meet with Her Highness Sheikha Moza, and government officials to discuss the Qatar National Library project, and the importance of libraries in society.Promoting access to information in the digital ageWork on Copyright Exceptions and Limitations continues at WIPO, and globallyIn July and November, members of IFLA’s delegation to WIPO and members of the Copyright and Other Legal Matters (CLM) Committee were engaged in the 24th and 25th meetings of the World Intellectual Property Organisation’s Standing Committee on Copyright & Related Rights (SCCR). The focus during these meetings was on a proposed treaty for Visually Impaired Persons, which IFLA strongly supports. Conclusions and statements from the meetings are now available.We continue to engage with organisations around the world on this topic, and in October I attended IFFRO’s AGM in Buenos Aires, Argentina, and also met with WIPO delegates in Santiago, Chile and Buenos Aires. At IFFRO I presented our perspective in a discussion on ‘Understanding User Needs and Delivering Solutions’ in terms of access, copyright and licences. In Santiago and Buenos Aires I met with government officials and colleagues to promote the views of libraries on copyright and access to information and the digital age. My video presentation discussing these issues with librarians at the Biblioteca Nacional de Argentina is now online.IFLA represents libraries at the international level, but we also rely on national library associations to help prepare their national delegations for these discussions at gatherings such as WIPO or UNESCO, where issues affecting libraries are increasingly debated. I had the opportunity to emphasize this message in my home country, as a keynote speaker at the Canadian Library Association conference in Ottawa, in June.Another opportunity to advance our work was the UNESCO Memory of the World in the Digital Age conference held in September in Vancouver, Canada. The outcome of the conference was the Vancouver Declaration, which in its preliminary form publicly endorses our work at WIPO. The Declaration will be revised with public consultation and put to the UNESCO Director General in 2013.Digital Lending: Taking actionModels for accessing digital content in the future, including models for digital lending of eBooks were the subject of an expert meeting held at IFLA Headquarters on November 26-27. The meeting brought together representatives from libraries, associations, legal experts and publishers to discuss fast-moving changes in publishing, business models, licensing and access to content in libraries. We will now work through the results of the meeting to prepare our advocacy strategy and tools to assist members in their own advocacy and negotiations.
Progress on Open AccessWith members of our Open Access taskforce, we presented workshops on Open Access in Geneva, in Rome at the UN Libraries meeting, and at the Berlin 10 conference held in Stellenbosch.Internet Governance ForumThe 7th meeting of the Internet Governance Forum (IGF) took place in Baku, Azerbaijan on November 6-9, where IFLA participated in four workshops. The first meeting of the Dynamic Coalition on Public Libraries was held in association with EIFL, and a large number of contacts were made for future work on IFLA’s Key Initiatives.Our Digital Futures: Presidential Meeting, Mexico City 2013My second Presidential meeting “Our Digital Futures” will be held 6-7 March 2013 in Mexico City, and I extend a warm invitation to you to attend and hear inspiring speakers address current issues on access to information for libraries including access for research and education, to enhance reading, for the cultural memory, and copyright exceptions and limitations. Registration is now open.Participants will also contribute to the development of the IFLA Trend Report on access in the global digital environment and information society that libraries will operate in over the next five years. The report will be launched at the IFLA World Library and Information Congress in Singapore, August 17-23 2013.Governing IFLAIFLA’s Governing Board, and committees including the Professional Committee, meets three times a year, and we look forward to meeting again next week at IFLA’s Headquarters in The Hague to discuss a number of strategic issues and to progress work on our five Key Initiatives.
NominationsWe have now started the process for elections of new Section Standing Committee members, new Division Chairs, a new Governing Board, and, the next IFLA President-elect. I will complete my term in August 2013 and hand over to President-Elect Sinikka Sipila, who will become the new IFLA President. These elections are very important, so if you are an IFLA member, please consider nominating candidates or standing for election. The results of the elections will be announced in June next year.Ingrid Parent
IFLA President 2011-2013———————————-
Subject: [RSCAO-L] CDNLAO Newsletter No.75 is now available

Dear Colleague:Apologies for cross-posting.CDNLAO Newsletter (http://www.ndl.go.jp/en/cdnlao/newsletter/index.html) is published every four months to carry information from national libraries and other institutions in the Asia and Oceania region. This newsletter is edited and distributed by the National Diet Library of Japan on behalf of the members of the Conference of Directors of National Libraries in Asia and Oceania (CDNLAO).CDNLAO Newsletter No.75 (http://www.ndl.go.jp/en/cdnlao/newsletter/075/75ind.html) carries the following articles:-Special topic:  Education and Training
[China] Education and Training in the National Library of China
[Japan] e-Learning programs of the National Diet Library
[Korea] Library Management Training for Military Camp and Prison Libraries
[Korea] NLK’s Librarian Online Training System
[Laos] Education Strategic Plan
[Malaysia] Training of Trainers Workshop on Media and Information Literacy-CDNLAO meeting
[Indonesia]  Hosting the 20th Conference of Directors of National Libraries in Asia and Oceania-News
[Japan] NDL Newsletter No. 184 features preservation activities of the National Diet LibraryDo you have any topics to be featured or comments on the newsletter? If yes, please feel free to contact to the editorial office at newsl@ndl.go.jp. We appreciate any ideas to improve the newsletter!Tadahiko Motoyoshi (Mr.)
Director
Branch Libraries and Cooperation Division
Administrative Department
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[ELEARN] Social Media Survey 2012 – McKiernan, Gerard [LIB]<gerrymck@iastate.edu
Colleagues/
For the past several years, Pearson has been researching faculty use of social media. Pearson’s collaboration with other thought leaders, including Babson Survey Research Group and Converseon, is one of the ways we’re gaining that understanding. As a reflection of our commitment to sharing our knowledge with the higher education community, the following pages contain the findings of our most recent social media survey.
Source and Links to Report, Report Podcast, Infographic, and News Coverage Available At
Enjoy !
/Gerry
Gerry McKiernan
Associate Professor
and
Science and Technology Librarian
Iowa State University
152 Parks Library
Ames IA 50011
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The new issue of Pakistan Journal of Library & Information Science (PJLIS) has been uploaded on its website:http://pu.edu.pk/home/journal/8With best regards,Khalid Mahmood, PhD
Professor of Library & Information Science, University of the Punjab,
Lahore, PAKISTAN
President, Pakistan Library Association
Chief Editor, Pakistan Journal of Library & Information Science
Cell: +92-333-4271285
Email: khalidmahmood@yahoo.com and khalid.dlis@pu.edu.pk
Internet: http://pu.edu.pk/faculty/description/96/Dr-Khalid-Mahmood.htmlPJLIS Issue 13 (2012)Guest Editorial: Technology and its impact on the information environment and society in developing countries
by Abebe RorissaMeasuring service quality in public and private sector university libraries of Pakistan
by Shafiq ur RehmanInformation seeking by Pakistani farmers: A review of published research
by Muhammad Asif Naveed, Mumtaz A. Anwar, Surraya BanoAccess and use of the internet among undergraduate students in the Faculty of Arts, University of Dhaka, Bangladesh
by Md. Anwarul Islam, Muhammad Jaber HossainUsability evaluation of an academic library website: A case of the University of the Punjab
by Memoona Iqbal, Nosheen Fatima WarraichICT skills of LIS students: A survey of two library schools of the Punjab
by Hafiza Zaheer Fatima, Farzana Shafique, Attia FirdousTeachers’ conceptions about information literacy skills of school children
by Syeda Hina Batool, Khalid MahmoodProspects of digitization in university libraries of Pakistan [Abstract]
by Muhammad RafiqModel information system for educational administrators in Pakistan [Abstract]
by Farzana ShafiqueSarhad Journal of Agriculture: A bibliometric study of the articles published from 1985 to 2009 [Abstract]
by Sajjad AhmadInformation seeking behavior of the forestry scientists of the Pakistan Forest Institute, Peshawar [Abstract]
by Shehzad AhmadStatus of techno stress among university librarians of Lahore [Abstract]
by Amna AsgharReading needs, facilities an
isually impaired people [Abstract]
by Shumaila IramPakistan Development Review: A bibliometric study of the articles published from 1973 to 2009 [Abstract]
by Sajjad Ullah JanInformation needs of Pakistani farmers: An exploratory study of adult male farmers in a village of Punjab [Abstract]
by Muhammad Asif NaveedChildren’s reading habits: A study of Lahore city [Abstract]
by Sania RasheedApplication of marketing in Punjab University libraries: An exploratory study [Abstract]
by Saira SoroyaDepartment of LIS at a glance: August 2011 – October 2012
by Syeda Hina Batool

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Colleagues

I am pleased to announce the publication of my Open Access Textbooks (OATs) LibGuide
The OATs Libguide provides access to descriptions and links to know initiatives and organizations that support the development and promotion of Open Access textbooks, and to OA and low-cost textbook catalogs and databases.
The guides includes the following tabs:
Definitions
Initiatives and Organizations
Bookboon
Boundless
College Open Textbooks
Community English Texts (Internet Archive)
Connexions
Dynamic Textbook Project
E-Books Directory
Flat World Knowledge
Open Course Library
Open Textbook Catalog (University of Minnesota)
Open Textbook Services (MERLOT)
Open Textbooks (OER Commons)
OpenStax College
Orange Grove Open Textbooks
Textbook Media
Textbook Revolution
Wikibooks
The OATs LibGuide is available via
In the near future, I will create a ‘Bibliography’ (or ‘Resources’) tab, and will begin to populate it with significant citations / blogs / slides / social media / etc. .
As always, any and all candidates for potential inclusion in OATs are most welcome !
Enjoy !

Gerry McKiernan
Associate Professor
and
Science and Technology Librarian
Iowa State University
152 Parks Library
Ames IA 50011

http://digital-textbooks.blogspot.com/

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Marketing Your Library

By Ned Potter

An interview with Terry Kendrick, guru of strategic marketing in libraries
Posted Tue, 11/13/2012 – 10:28
Terry Kendrick

Marketing strategist Terry Kendrick says libraries need to separate themselves from the competition: “Any activities a library does or any service it offers, it’s unlikely that we’ll be the only people offering that service.”

Terry Kendrick is the guru of strategic marketing in libraries. His book Developing Strategic Marketing Plans That Really Work is a must-read, and he writes, speaks, and runs workshops on marketing libraries all over the UK and in no fewer than 26 countries abroad. He also brings a nonlibrary perspective to the table, lecturing in marketing at the University of East Anglia in the UK.

I talked to him about all things marketing strategy for my recent book The Library Marketing Toolkit (Facet, 2012).
NED POTTER: Do you think that strategic marketing is undervalued in libraries generally?
TERRY KENDRICK: I do. I think strategy setting is very well respected, I think libraries are very good at writing strategy documents, and I think they’re actually quite reasonable at doing tactical programs. The problem is that the strategic marketing planning part within those programs isn’t always so well bought into, because it’s hard and it requires a lot of resources that aren’t always readily available.
What are the consequences of marketing as an afterthought? As in, the differences between making marketing a priority versus libraries that just do marketing if they get a chance once they’ve done everything else?
Many libraries are driven by a series of pump-priming initiatives, so very few use a full marketing approach. Many libraries feel the need to market what they’ve done as an initiative, and then they’re quite often disappointed by it because it’s been done as a series of one-off activities without the coherence of a marketing plan. Is there evidence that marketing makes a difference? What I see in North America—in Canada in particular, where they’re more marketing driven—is that it does make a real difference.
Is the first step to creating a marketing strategy understanding your own library or understanding the market your library is in?
The first step in creating any marketing plan is knowing what your ambition is. If you don’t know what you want to be, the market doesn’t matter and your capabilities don’t matter either. It’s very important to know what you want to look like—putting some numbers on that will focus the mind immediately. If you say you want to grow 30% over the next “X” number of years, that’ll certainly focus your mind on the marketing: Where in the market will that 30% come from? Which users will give us issues, visits, enquiries, database hits—whatever it is that is driving the performance measures in that organization.
There is a difficulty in using numbers, though: Perhaps libraries aren’t used to planning like that—they find that quite intimidating. They want to do the promotional side of things rather than the harder side of the thinking. They’re very good at doing things, and it feels good to do something, but to think your way through something is hard work; it can cause discord. And because there’s not a culture of connecting marketing with the strategic planning, the numbers that should be used as part of the marketing plan are seen as irrelevant to that process when, in fact, they’re very important.
Tell me about the importance of the library brand fitting into the user’s lifestyle.
For most of the things we want to be associated with, we’ve got to feel good about them. We’ve got to feel that if we’re seen there, then we’re seen as “okay” by the people whose opinions we value. People tend to have tribes and lifestyles and they live their lives in particular ways. It’s not always the case that a library fits closely to that. If you have a lifestyle that, for instance, is fairly relaxed, you might want the library to be relaxed. The trouble is others’ lifestyles might not be quite as relaxed, so there’ll be a tension there in the way you market your service, which is very difficult to do. Good marketers can deal with that; they can market to different user groups with different lifestyles simultaneously. Libraries don’t always understand the life cycle of their users, what they’re doing in their lives.
Are any aspects of marketing strategy true across the board, or should everything be “on spec”?
There are a few key concepts. One of them is that every library should be looking at the value it can offer its users in the way they live their lives, the journeys that they’re on during their busy days, and how it helps them get there. There’s no point in having (and talking about) resources when there is little value in the resource; the value only appears when the resource is in use. If you draw attention to the resource without explaining the outcomes that come from using that resource, you’re actually setting yourself up to be cut, because suddenly you draw attention to a pile of money being spent (for example on databases).
All libraries need to look at their value. The other thing that is key is that not everyone perceives the same value in library services. So for every library doing marketing, it’s key to undertake segmentation, because it’s the differences that matter rather than the similarities. It’s no good looking for the one true way, but if you look at the value each segment attaches to the library, you’ve got the core of what marketing is about. Your planning should be driven by segments rather than the library as a whole, with an overarching strategy for the library. What brings in the business and activity are the segments.
How do we ensure marketing is ongoing?
As libraries follow certain initiatives (rather than whole-service planning), quite often lots of activities will happen that are unconnected. It’s really important, structurally, to have somebody whose responsibility it is to look at the activities and find synergies to build on, particularly given that we know that one-off marketing activities will tend to be disappointing in their rate of response.
Real results come from a certain amount of “touches” to a particular user group over a period of time. It’s really important that somebody is overseeing this. They don’t have to be called marketing specialists. Marketing works best when it’s an orientation for the library as a whole.
The worst thing that can happen is: We send out some marketing that is successful, people respond and come in to claim the “offer” we’re giving them, and they’re met with a poor response. That does more than just negate the activity you’ve just done; it positively reinforces the library as something that sends you irrelevant messages or makes promises it can’t deliver. So next time they receive a message from the library, their first thought will be, “Last time I received a message, they made an offer they didn’t deliver on,” not, “Let’s open this lovely message from the library.”
Understanding the market is a key part of the process.
Yes, any activities a library does or any service it offers, it’s unlikely these days that we’ll be the only people offering the service that people want. It’s really important when you make an offer to your patrons that you understand what other things will be in their minds, what other offers are being made to them that are similar, what other ways of achieving the same things people will have. Sometimes there’ll be obvious other ways like Google. Sometimes it’s less obvious: It may be a friend they know who can help them with the same thing, or a strong competitor may be doing nothing, as in: Why bother? It’s important to understand what our offer looks like compared with competing offers. If we don’t know that, we’re likely to think that just marketing something will make it attractive. But who else is there? Who are our rivals?
Can we make more of marketing the librarians rather than the library?
The more we can make the service look personal, the better. An easy and quick way of doing this is to put pictures of librarians online and on promotional activity. I can understand the reluctance to do this, but we are, after all, a service, not a product. Services are created by people, and they depend on how well people respond. Products are the same wherever you get them from. Services are different—people have skills, which is what makes us different from an information resource. Provided we have high-quality skills, it’s better to promote the people who deliver the service than it is to promote the products themselves. It’s the people who add value to information.
Any tips for quick wins in library marketing?
Some of the quick wins in marketing are based around the key areas of segmentation and value. Many marketing activities will take quite a while to build up. If you try and look at the whole service at once, you’ll probably find the set of offers you have are either not strong enough or you won’t have enough resources to fully implement them. So it’s best to choose one group of people you fully understand in terms of what they value, how they use your resources, what their outcomes are. Then take that segment through a whole marketing planning cycle. It should be more manageable and should have impact relatively quickly, and everyone knows nothing succeeds like success.
People don’t want to necessarily do a large amount of marketing; those people need to see those quick wins. There’s a phrase about how you can lead a horse to water but you can’t make it drink. The real trick is to make the horse thirsty, then take it to the water. To make people thirsty for marketing within your organization, you have to show them quick wins, because in these difficult times no one wants to work hard on something that won’t bear fruit for three to five years. There are a lot of benefits in the long-term view, but it takes a lot of nerve to just wait for them. So you need the quick wins to help get you there.
People always buy into marketing libraries; they really want to do it. But they go away, and it just doesn’t happen. Six months later they’ve written a big document outlining everything, but the priorities have shifted. Advocacy and marketing, they’ve got to be bedfellows, haven’t they? What a marketing plan does is make sure the offer that advocates make is actually there for the advocacy to work.
It’s an important time because if you look around the world, libraries are being cut all over. It feels as though something bigger is happening, not just in libraries. We have to be careful because it could be that the last 30 years of libraries not biting the bullet on marketing is going to finally cost us.
NED POTTER is an academic liaison librarian at the University of York, UK, where he also manages the marketing interns. This interview appears in his Library Marketing Toolkit (Facet, 2012), which is available at alastore.ala.org. he regularly speaks and writes on the subject of marketing libraries and information services, having provided marketing expertise for clients ranging from the Latvian Ministry of Culture to the Bodleian Library at the University of Oxford. You can find more information about his book at librarymarketingtoolkit.com.

Ned Potter’s Guide to Libraries Doing Great Marketing Work

Topeka and Shawnee County (Kans.) Public Library is the king of the digital branch. In my view, its website is everything a library website should be: dynamic, informative, varied, and stylish, in a way we should all aspire to. Go to the library’s website and have a look as soon as you finish reading this. Digital Branch Manager David Lee King, who is also a columnist for American Libraries, provides seven tips for an awesome library website as a case study in the book.
New York Public Library is surely the most successful example of a library absolutely owning its social media. Staff members make excellent use not just of all the tools you’d expect, such as blogs and Facebook, but also the likes of Tumblr, Foursquare, and YouTube. With well more than 200,000 followers on Twitter (@NYPL), it’s the leader of the pack on that platform, and in the Toolkit, NYPL provides a case study to tell you how the library did it.
Calgary Public Library, over the border in Alberta, Canada, proves that even in the age of social media, good old-fashioned advertising campaigns can be extremely effective. Its fantastic “Everything You’re Into” campaign has been plastered everywhere: on coffee cups, in grocery stores, and even jet-washed onto local pavement. It aimed to change perceptions, and it really worked.
Columbus (Ohio) Metropolitan Library is a great example of a library that has brilliantly overhauled its marketing. It started by segmenting users by behavior, then rebranded its services to appeal to different groups, and moved forward from there. Library staff members provide a case study in the book about going beyond counting (outputs) to measuring behavioral change (outcomes).
Troy (Mich.) Public Library recently came in fifth in a marketing-industry poll of most-effective advertisers in the US, just behind Microsoft and ahead of Ikea, Unilever, and American Express. Its most eye-catching initiative has undoubtedly been its incredibly brave (and fabulously effective) reverse-psychology book-burning campaign, which saved the library from closure. Watch the video about it on YouTube.

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Camel libraries improve literacy in Kenya

By Bosire Boniface in Wajir

November 07, 2012
Nearby under an acacia tree, a group of enthusiastic children and adults watch as the librarians unload wooden boxes full of books. After the contents are spread around on mats, the children and adults swarm over the books to choose one to read in the shade.
Twelve-year-old Kalkach resident Mohammed Adan Mohamud said reading books has helped him improve his communication skills. “The camels bring the books twice a month to our village and the books have expanded my knowledge of issues such as other cultures,” he said.
Thousands of residents of North Eastern Province have benefitted from the Camel Mobile Library, a service that was initiated by the Kenya National Library Services in 1996 to improve literacy in the region, said North Eastern Province librarian Rashid Mohammed Farah.
As of last October, there were more than 6,000 registered and more than 5,000 unregistered library users in the province, he told Sabahi.
The library mostly provides books that aid students learning English in line with the national school curriculum, he said. The mobile library operates Monday through Thursday between 8 am and 6 pm.
“Members can borrow up to two books for 14 days until the mobile library returns to the same centre,” Farah said. “Then they can renew their books or return them for new ones.”
While the services have improved the accessibility of books to many citizens, Farah said it has the potential to further increase access and reduce the high illiteracy rate in the province.
Currently, services are only available within 11 kilometres of Garissa and Wajir, he said, adding that the library has nine camels and three caravans serving the two centres daily. “In Garissa we dispatch two mobile units to two different centres each day because it is big. In Wajir we dispatch a single mobile unit,” he said.
“We would like to extend the services beyond the radius to other towns such as Ijara and Mandera, but we cannot because of little funding,” he said. “We have a stack of letters and applications from learning institutions that want us to take the services to them but we are limited.”
According to North Eastern Provincial Director of Education Adan Sheikh Abdullahi, the literacy level in the province has risen to 15% from 9% about 10 years ago. In addition, schools that are served by the mobile libraries are among the best performing in the province in national examinations, he told Sabahi.
More importantly, he said the libraries are helping to cultivate a culture of reading among disadvantaged segments of society that are not near stationary libraries and would otherwise be left behind.

Moving beyond camels to improve education

Since the majority of citizens in the province lead a nomadic lifestyle, stationary libraries are of no use, Abdullahi said, adding that more funding to increase the staff of mobile libraries would ensure nomadic families are followed wherever they go.
Wajir District librarian Marian Osman told Sabahi that additional funding would improve people’s access through the introduction of motorised libraries that do not rely on camels for transport.
“If we cannot move to motorised mobile libraries, we want to increase the number of camels involved in transporting books,” she said.
Library organisers also need land to graze the camels, particularly during the drought season when they are forced to cut services to twice a week. “Because there are no pastures to feed the camels, we cannot keep the camels all day waiting in the hot sun without anything as we wait for the children to be through with reading,” she said.
Mohammed Bunow Korane, director of the Jihan Foundation, an organisation that sponsors the education of girls in North Eastern Province, said that while the initiative has achieved relative success, the government needs to come up with long-term plans for pastoralists to further improve education standards.
“Many families cannot afford books and the little they have they spend on food,” Korane said. “Under such circumstances, people do not value books. Learning is a continuous process and the period between camel library visits is crucial.”
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PROMOTING READING AMONG KIDS
Reading is Fundamental (RIF) is a campaign launched by the Library of Congress (USA). To know more, please visit the following website where you can view either the Film, listen to the Story or hear the Song or simply take the Pledge. Enjoy these captivating tips on how to promote reading specially among kids. Remember “Catch them Young ” is the best strategy to promote reading among children. Food for thoughts. Spark your imagination and  enjoy !  Get inspired to take concrete action here in Mauritius. Don’t wait for others to do it for you.
http:www.bookpeopleunite.org
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Open Access Textbooks:
A Treasure Trove Of Slideshare Presentations on Open Access Textbooks > Part I-A
1. The $5 Textbook

http://digital-textbooks.blogspot.com/2012/10/the-5-textbook.html

2. Adopting Open Textbooks
3. Breaking the IronTriangle: “The Obviousness of Open Policy”
4. Building Communities of Practice to Encourage Open Textbook Use
5. Call for Action: Open Textbook Translation
6. College Open Textbooks: Collaborative & Business Models
7. Create the Medical Digital ‘Textbook’ of the Future
8. Developing a Culture of Sharing and Receiving: Open Educational Resources
9. Developing a Culture of Sharing and Receiving: Open Source Textbooks and Open Courses
10. Discover and Select: An Open Textbook or Module
11. Discover Open Textbooks: Make Education More Affordable
12. Discover Open Textbooks: Pre-Workshop Slides
13. Empowering Faculty & Students to Improve Teaching and Learning with Open Textbooks
14. Expand Your Classroom Walls with Open Educational Resources (OER)
15. Finding and Selecting High Quality OER
16. Flat World Knowledge: Open Textbooks by Expert Authors
17. Fostering OER-Friendly Policies
18. In Search of Affordable Textbooks: How OER Can Reduce Costs
19. Latest Trends in Open Textbook Research > Panel Discussion
20. Make Textbooks Affordable
21. The Obviousness of Open Textbooks (& Policy & Courseware & Data & Science)
Enjoy !
Gerry McKiernan
Associate Professor
and
Science and Technology Librarian
Iowa State University
Ames IA 50011
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A new issue of ‘Libri: International Journal of Libraries and Information Services’ is now available online from De Gruyter Online.

Please click on the links below to view the new contents:
Hanna Carlsson
Nancy  Sánchez-Tarragó, J. Carlos Fernández-Molina, & Alejandro Caballero Rivero
Atif Yousef Odeh
Seongsin Lee
Kuan-Nien Chen, & In-Ting Huang
Williams Nwagwu, & Olamide Olatunji
Soraya Ziaei, & Fatemeh Nooshinfard
Ajit K. Pyati, & Ahmad M. Kamal
Professor Ian M. Johnson
Joint Editor
Libri: international journal of libraries and information services
The Robert Gordon University
Aberdeen
Great Britain
Phone: 01224 740785
Mobile: 07719 859239
Skype: ian.m.johnson45
Libri:-
Instructions for authors: http://librijournal.org
Editorial office: libri@statsbiblioteket.dk
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EIFL newsletter –  Knowledge Without Boundarieshttp://www.eifl.net/newsletter/59
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SLA Connections – 11 September 2012http://www.sla.org/connections/
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[IFLA-L] Two New IFLA Publications: Libraries Driving Access to Knowledge (A2K) & 85 Years IFLA: A History and Chronology of Sessions 1927-2012

2 NEW IFLA Publications!
Just off the press as Nr 151 and Nr 155 in the IFLA Publications Series…
Libraries Driving Access to KnowledgeThis book is a must for librarians with international interest in access to knowledge. It includes a collection of 15 chapters written by authors from all over the world and covers different approaches to the vital role of libraries driving access to knowledge. There are chapters that offer solutions and ideas to enable libraries to become the knowledge engine in society. Other chapters discuss the conceptual part of the subject and related services. The book was compiled as part of the presidential theme of Ellen Tise, IFLA President 2009-2011, with the aim of offering the reader a good portrait of the opportunities and challenges that libraries have in driving access to knowledge.
Libraries Driving Access to Knowledge (A2K)
Edited by Jesús Lau,  Anna Maria Tammaro & Theo Bothma
Berlin/Munich: De Gruyter Saur, 2012
ISBN 978-3-11-025326-9
(IFLA Publications; Nr 151)
Euro 99,95 / for USA, Canada, Mexico US$ 140.00
Special price for IFLA members Euro 79,95 / for USA, Canada, Mexico US$ 112.00
85 Years IFLA: A History and Chronology of Sessions 1927–2012Published in honor of the 85th anniversary of IFLA, 85 Years IFLA: A History and Chronology of Sessions 1927-2012 presents a thorough history of the organization from its 1927 founding through 2012. Supplemented with a bibliography, appendixes, and index, 85 Years IFLA is the definitive guide to the largest international library association in the world, as well as the leading body representing the interests of library and information services and their users today.
85 Years IFLA : A History and Chronology of Sessions 1927-2012
Jeffrey M. Wilhite
Berlin/Munich: De Gruyter Saur, 2012
ISBN 978-3-11-025329-0
(IFLA Publications; Nr 155)
Euro 89,95 / for USA, Canada, Mexico US$ 126.00
Special price for IFLA members Euro 69,95 / for USA, Canada, Mexico US$ 98.00

De Gruyter Saur Verlag                                                For the USA – Canada – Mexico

Rhenus Medien Logistik GmbH & Co. KG                      Walter de Gruyter, Inc.
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to unsubscribe to IFLA-L, please visit: http://infoserv.inist.fr/wwsympa.fcgi/sigrequest/ifla-l
2 Attached files| 54KB
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[IFLA-L] EUscreen exhibitions released

Dear madam/sir,EUscreen makes thousands of items from Europe’s television history freely available through its online portal and through the European heritage portal Europeana. The project now announces its online exhibitions, a new addition to the portal that helps users, educators and the general audience to get the most out of this exciting collection.We would like to warmly invite you to visit http://www.euscreen.eu/exhibitions.html and to share the news in your publication, within your networks and to interested friends and colleagues.Please find the full press release and audiovisual materials at http://euscreen.pressdoc.com/33201-euscreen-releases-online-exhibitions.Thank you for attention, apologies for any possible cross-posts,
Erwin Verbruggen // EUscreen consortium
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[IFLA-L] Library Buildings and Equipment Section’s Newsletter 2012:2
Dear colleagues,
Please find our Newsletter, 2012 no 2, from Library Buildings and Equipment Section online on the Section’s website:
In this issue we have :
–        Report from the Section’s Midterm Meeting  with visits on several libraries in Germany
You will also find information about
–       The Section’s Open Session in Helsinki and The Sections’s SC meetings
–       “Designing the Future Library” – Session 110a  
With best regards,
Ingvild Monsen
Editor of the Newsletter
Ingvild Monsen
Head of Department
Bergen University College
The Library-Nordnes
Haugeveien 28
N-5005 BERGEN
Norway
Phone: +4755587872
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Building Strong Library Associations: Impact Report 2012 – http://www.ifla.org/en/BSLA/impact.
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[IFLA] Last Issue of Information World Journal and Invitation to Contributions for Next Issue
Dear colleagues,

We would like to inform you that we have published last issue of Information World Journal (IWJ – formerly known as Bilgi Dünyası). The last issue of IWJ is available on our web site (http://www.bd.org.tr/index.php/bd/user/setLocale/en_US).


We also would like to announce that the next issue of the IWJ will be published in October, 2012. Therefore, we would be happy to publish your papers in the IWJ. You can submit your manuscript until September 10, 2012 via our journal management system (http://bd.org.tr/index.php/bd/login).


IWJ is a peer-reviewed international journal dealing with LIS and has been published twice in a year since 2000 by the University and Research Librarians’ Association (UNAK) in Turkey. IWJ publishes (in Turkish or English) original articles on research works, survey articles, opinion papers and book reviews, concerning information, documentation and other library science topics along with professional news and meeting announcements.
IWJ is indexed and abstracted in LISA (Library and Information Science Abstracts); EBSCOHost-LISTA (Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts); IndexCopernicus and Turkish Academic Network and Information Center’s (ULAKBIM) Social Sciences Database. IWJ is an Open Access Journal and listed in DOAJ (Directory of Open Access Journals) and E-LIS (E-Prints in Library and Information Science). Also IWJ is a candidate for Thomson Reuters ISI and SCOPUS.
We are kindly looking forward to seeing your contributions.
Thank you very much in advance
Yours faithfully
Nevzat Özel – Tolga Çakmak
Editors of Information World Journal
{nevzat, tolga} @bd.org.tr
IWJ Vol 13 / No: 1 Table of Contents
Refereed Articles


Expert vs. Novices Dimensions of Tagging Behaviour in an Educational Setting [English] – Sonja ŠPIRANEC, Mislav BOROVAC – http://bd.org.tr/index.php/bd/article/view/2/22


Bibliographic Data Towards the Semantic Web: A Review of Key Issues and Recent Experiences [English] – Iryna SOLODOVNIK – http://bd.org.tr/index.php/bd/article/view/3/23

The Approach to the Institution of Library in Turkey’s Science and Technology Policies [Turkish] – Bülent YILMAZ, Ömer DALKIRAN – http://bd.org.tr/index.php/bd/article/view/5/25

The Importance of Information Management System Design for Cost Accounting in Production Companies – [Turkish] – Benhür SATIR – http://bd.org.tr/index.php/bd/article/view/5/25

A Study on Information Retrieval Problems of Visually Impaired University Students [Turkish] – Aynur AYDIN – http://bd.org.tr/index.php/bd/article/view/6/26

Information Security Issues in a Digital Library Environment: A Literature Review – [English] – Audrey ANDAY, Enrico FRANCESE, Hugo C. HUURDEMAN, Muharrem YILMAZ, Dydimus ZENGENENE – http://bd.org.tr/index.php/bd/article/view/7/27

Assessment of School Culture Based on the Views of School Librarians – [Turkish] – H. İnci ÖNAL, Selda EKİCİ – http://bd.org.tr/index.php/bd/article/view/8/28

Publication Drain in Turkey: A Study on Publications Indexed in Web of Science and ULAKBIM National Databases – [Turkish] – Kasım BİNİCİ – http://bd.org.tr/index.php/bd/article/view/9/29

A Citation Analysis for Thesis Prepared by Departments of the Natural Sciences in University of Tabriz, Iran – [Turkish] – Jahangir GHOLIPOUR –  http://bd.org.tr/index.php/bd/article/view/10/30

Confrontation of the Industrial Information with the Cyprus Turkish Industry: Awareness and the Level of Needs – [Turkish] – Ayşe OKTAN –  http://bd.org.tr/index.php/bd/article/view/11/31

E-mail Management Systems as an Enterprise Information Resource – [Turkish] –  Özgür KÜLCÜ – http://bd.org.tr/index.php/bd/article/view/12/32

Opinion Papers
On Knowledge Organization – [English] – Alan GILCHRIST – http://bd.org.tr/index.php/bd/article/view/13/33


Kyrgyz Libraries Community – Co-Operation for Development: New Challenges and New Approaches – [English] – Sania BATTALOVA – http://bd.org.tr/index.php/bd/article/view/14/34
[IFLA] New Publications Catalog: Library & Information Science
 
The De Gruyter Saur new titles catalog, containing a listing of all IFLA Publications, is now available athttp://www.degruyter.com/dg/page/186.Please take a minute to check pages 2 thru 6 which give a listing of all new and recent volumes in the following series: IFLA Publications, IFLA Series on Bibliographic Control, and Global Studies in Libraries and Information.In addition the catalog offers a useful oversight over the other LIS publications of De Gruyter Saur.
Continuing Professional Development and Workplace Learning Section (CPDWL) Newsletter
The June 2012 issue of the CPDWL section is now published and is available at: http://www.ifla.org/en/news/82
Latest issue of IFLA Journal: Volume 38, No. 2  (June 2012)
Finnish Public Library Policy 2015
National Strategic areas of focus – Library Policy.
Namibia Library and Information Policy 2030
Supporting People’s need in Namibia’s Knowledge Based Economy – Namibia policy .
Expanding Access to Published Research
The package of measures on expanding access to research publications in the UK which are set out in the Finch Report released today may be of interest to those interested in Open Access – http://www.researchinfonet.org/publish/finch/.
The Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ)

Since the launch of the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ) in May 2003, the service has received much attention from the library community all over the world. The number of journals included in the directory has risen from approximately 300 to over 7500 and the number is continuously growing. All content can be harvested and integrated into the library’s own collection.

The University Library at Lund University, Sweden has on a voluntary basis developed and operates the service. The development of the DOAJ has been partly funded by, amongst others, the Open Society Institute, but from January 1st 2007 no further significant funding was available. In the long run, my organization cannot commit to the necessary funding without external contributions. We thus rely on your support to DOAJ.

A DOAJ membership offers you a tremendous opportunity to generate goodwill and support the Open Access movement as well as earn the appreciation of librarians and publishers.

Kindest regards,
Björn WittenmarkActing Head Librarian
Lund University Libraries, Sweden.
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TO ALL APL MEMBERS
Members of the Association of Professional Librarians (APL) can derive much benefit by accessing freely, full-text journal articles, simply by selecting BROWSE (top left-hand corner of the main page), SOCIAL SCIENCES and then Library and Information Science.
The latter includes no less than 131 journals, whereas Education comprises 533 journals, Psychology 160 journals, Media and Communication 102 journals, etc.
I.Ramjaun
President APL – Mauritius. June 2012.

http://www.doaj.org
http://www.doaj.org/doaj?func=membership&uiLanguage=en

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GUIDELINES OF LIBRARIES OF GOVERNMENT DEPARTMENTS
The IFLA Government Libraries Section has recently prepared new translations for the Guidelines for Libraries of Government Departments in French, Hindi and Catalan.

This set of recommendations is now available in 8 languages, expecting to be useful to more librarians who are working at government agencies.
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RESEARCH JOURNAL PUBLISHES LIS GRADUATE STUDENT WRITING
Is librarian certification necessary to ensure high quality service? What trends and challenges do law librarians face in the twenty-first century? Graduate students from three universities investigate these topics and more in the new Spring issue of the San Jose State University School of Library and Information Science (SJSU SLIS) Student Research Journal (SRJ), a peer-reviewed open source online publication.
Volume 2, Issue 1 of the SRJ features:
 
  • Closing the Research/Practice Gap: The Journey from Student to Practitioner, Stacey Nordlund, Editor-in-Chief, SJSU SLIS
  • Value of the Research Methods Course: Voices from LIS Practitioners, Lili Luo, Assistant Professor, SJSU SLIS
  • Certification of Librarians: An Unproven Demand, Jonathan Pacheco Bell, SJSU SLIS
  • An Exploratory Study of Online Information Regarding Colony Collapse Disorder, Meredith K. Boehm, University of Tennessee – Knoxville
  • Using Organization Theory to Explore the Changing Role of Medical Libraries, Kathy J. Fatkin, Emporia State University
  • International Legal Collections at U.S. Academic Law School Libraries, Camelia Naranch, SJSU SLIS
The articles are available online in PDF format at: http://scholarworks.sjsu.edu/slissrj/vol2/iss1/
The SRJ, established in 2010, promotes graduate scholarship and intellectual inquiry in library and information science, archives and records management, and museum studies through publishing two issues annually and accepts submissions on a rolling basis. It is San Jose State University’s first student-governed research journal.
For more information about the SRJ, please visit: http://scholarworks.sjsu.edu/slissrj/
For more information about the School of Library and Information Science at San Jose State University, please visit: http://slisweb.sjsu.edu
———————–
MEDICAL LIBRARY NEWSLETTER – Spring Edition

by Wiley-Blackwell Library Marketing Team <onlinelibraryinfo@wiley.com>

———————-

THE IFLA ELECTRONIC RESOURCE GUIDE:

The IFLA Electronic Resource Guide prepared by the Acquisition & Collection Development Section has now been updated thanks to various comments we’ve been receiving from the librarians community until the end of April.You’ll find the document to download at the following URL: http://www.ifla.org/en/publications/key-issues-for-e-resource-collection-development-a-guide-for-libraries.
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GUIDELINES FOR SUBJECT ACCESS IN NATIONAL BIBLIOGRAPHIES:

 Just off the press as Nr. 45 in the IFLA Series on Bibliographic Control…
In a networked and globalized world of information the form of national bibliographies may have changed, however their major function remains unchanged: to inform about a country’s publication landscape, its cultural and intellectual heritage. Subject access offers a major route into this landscape providing information about the dispersion of publications in specific fields of knowledge and topics contained in a particular national publishing output. The Guidelines for Subject Access in National Bibliographies give graded recommendations concerning subject indexing policies for national bibliographic agencies and illustrating various policies by providing best practice examples.
Guidelines for Subject Access in National Bibliographies | Edited by Yvonne Jahns | Berlin/Munich: De Gruyter Saur, 2012 | ISBN 978-3-11-028089-0 | IFLA Series on Bibliographic Control Nr 45 | Euro 59.95 / for USA, Canada, Mexico US$ 84.00 | Special price for IFLA members Euro 49.95 / for USA, Canada, Mexico US$ 70.00
Also available as an eBook
Order:

De Gruyter Saur Verlag             For the USA – Canada – Mexico

Rhenus Medien Logistik GmbH & Co. KG                      Walter de Gruyter, Inc.
Justus-von-Liebig-Straße 1                                                P.O. Box 960
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